Marlin JacksonAlbert Dickson/Sporting News/Getty Images
Score: Colts 38, Patriots 34

Date: Jan. 21, 2007. Site: RCA Dome

In a closer vote than it should have been, Indianapolis Colts cornerback Marlin Jackson's interception against the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship Game -- a play that helped seal an 18-point comeback and a spot in the Super Bowl -- was voted as the team's most memorable play.

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I went into the voting earlier this week thinking Jackson's interception would be the clear winner.

I was wrong. So were a number of other people, too.

That play received 40 percent of the more than 30,000 votes, barely edging out quarterback Peyton Manning's then-record breaking 49th touchdown pass against the San Diego Chargers in 2004. Manning's touchdown pass received 38 percent of the votes.

The Colts' 28-point comeback against Kansas City in the playoffs last season was a distant third in the voting (22 percent).

Manning's record-setting touchdown passing obviously is huge because it's a milestone during what will end up being a Hall-of-Fame career. But Jackson's interception was substantial for the franchise.

The Colts had been eliminated by the Patriots the previous two times they faced each other in the playoffs. Indianapolis finally got New England, the AFC power squad, off its back in a fashion that didn't seem possible when the Colts walked into the locker room down 15 points at halftime.

So after four consecutive playoff appearances that ended short of a Super Bowl appearance, Manning and the Colts celebrated clinching a Super Bowl berth in front of their fans.

"[The Patriots] were a nemesis of ours for years," Jackson said. "We beat them to get over the hump. And the fashion we were able to come back after being down by 18 points and still believing because of a great simple speech by coach Tony Dungy."

The Colts went on to beat the Chicago Bears 29-17 in the Super Bowl.

An interception that helped the franchise eventually win a Super Bowl or a touchdown pass that set a single-season record?

Seems like an easy choice to make even if the voting didn't appear that way.
J.J. WattTroy Taormina/USA TODAY Sports
We have a winner.

You fans got it right. With an overwhelming percentage of the vote, Houston Texans fans selected J.J. Watt's famous pick-six as the most memorable play in franchise history.

Watt's play competed against two other finalists: the "Rosencopter" in 2008 and Billy Miller's 2002 touchdown against the Dallas Cowboys. Rosencopter, of course, was the play in which quarterback Sage Rosenfels fumbled the ball as he twisted like a helicopter, propelling the Indianapolis Colts in a comeback. Miller scored the first touchdown in franchise history against the Cowboys, a score that led to the first win in franchise history during what was the team's first regular-season game.

Score: Texans 31, Bengals 10

Date: January 7, 2012; Site: Reliant Stadium

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What makes a play memorable is how it makes you feel. One fan on Twitter said Miller's touchdown gave fans in Houston a sense that the NFL was truly back. Rosencopter's devastation in that 2008 game stirred strong emotions as well. And, as we talked about earlier this week, humans tend to remember negative experiences more intensely than positive ones.

Ultimately, though, the winner was a play that meant something on a grander scale. Watt's pick-six came just before halftime during the wild-card round of the playoffs following the 2011 season. Houston faced the Cincinnati Bengals and was tied when Watt got in the way of an Andy Dalton pass. He tipped it to himself and returned the interception for a touchdown.

This is a young organization. Its first season was just in 2002, so there isn't a lot of history here yet. It's being created year by year; you get to be part of it. Rivalries and team folklore are created during the playoffs. That's when it means more. Watt has already secured a special place in the story of the Texans.
Kevin DysonAllen Kee/Getty Images
Score: Titans 22, Bills 16
Date: Jan. 8, 2000 Site: Adelphia Coliseum

ESPN.com readers rated the Music City Miracle the franchise’s most memorable play in a landslide vote, and they got it right.

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Mike Renfro's non-catch catch in the 1979 AFC Championship Game influenced the creation of the instant replay system and hurt the Oilers badly. Had it gone the other way, maybe the Oilers would have won the game and a Super Bowl. Maybe Bum Phillips would have coached them for more than one more year. Maybe they never would have moved.

Kevin Dyson's fruitless reach for the end zone that came up 1 yard short on the final play of Super Bowl XXXIV is an iconic NFL play, but much more for the Rams and Mike Jones, who made the tackle.

But two "negative" plays never stood a chance against a phenomenal positive play.

The Music City Miracle is a prominent fixture in lists and videos of all-time great finishes in the NFL and in sports.

It was a creative surprise. It pulled a win out of a loss. It sparked a playoff run.

It made or enhanced reputations for coach Jeff Fisher; play architect Alan Lowry; Lorenzo Neal, who fielded Steve Christie's squib kickoff; Frank Wycheck, who threw the lateral; and Kevin Dyson, who fielded the lateral and scored a 75-yard touchdown.

Although it seems clear that the throw didn't go forward, good luck convincing anyone in Buffalo of that.

The lasting controversy over that only helps to make it more memorable.

The most memorable play in the franchise's history.
Jimmy SmithJamie Squire/Getty Images
Score: Jaguars 30, Broncos 27
Date: Jan. 4, 1997 Site: Mile High Stadium

We have a winner. The voters picked Mark Brunell's pass to Jimmy Smith to beat the Denver Broncos in the playoffs as the Jacksonville Jaguars' most memorable play. And it's understandable because of what a huge upset that was, but Morten Andersen’s missed field goal in 1996 is the play that I consider the most memorable.

What happened in late December 1996 and early January 1997 is the most magical time in Jaguars history. The playoff victory in Buffalo and the amazing come-from-behind victory the following week in Denver against the top-seeded Broncos sent Jaguars fans into a frenzy.

Who can blame them? A second-year franchise playing in the conference title game? Ridiculous. The New Orleans Saints were born in 1967 but didn’t have a winning season until 1987. They didn’t get their first playoff victory until their 34th season. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers made the playoffs in their fourth season (1979) but lost their first 26 games and went 7-37 in their first three seasons.

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Yet here were the Jaguars, with a winning record and a postseason appearance one year after going 4-12.

Perhaps the most captivating part of their playoff run happened in the early morning hours following their 30-27 upset of the 14-point favorite Broncos, a game which included one of the other nominees for most memorable play. The pilot of the team charter had gotten word that about 40,000 fans who had watched the game on the Jacksonville Municipal Stadium scoreboards hadn’t left and were waiting for the team. He even detoured for a quick flyover of the stadium.

Fans lined the main road to Jacksonville International Airport and cheered as the team buses headed toward the stadium. They arrived to a raucous pep rally that lasted well past 1:30 a.m.

Even though the Jaguars lost at New England in the AFC Championship Game, that 16-day span remains the most wonderful time in franchise history -- even ahead of the 1999 season in which the Jaguars went 14-2 and lost in the AFC title game.

Remember how incredible it was? The amazement? electricity around the city?

None of that would have been possible without Andersen missing that field-goal attempt.

Andersen had made 59 consecutive field goals from 30 yards or closer dating back to 1989, and this was a 30-yarder from the middle of the field. Piece. Of. Cake.

But then ... his right foot slipped as he planted ... his left-footed attempt sailed just left of the upright ... and the Jaguars were in the playoffs.

That play started it all and it should be the one Jaguars fans never forget.

Texans' biggest key to success

July, 10, 2014
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Fitzpatrick
I suspect this answer will be the same for all the teams that lack the following.

Consistency at quarterback is the biggest key to the Houston Texans' success over the next three years.

Our Insiders have compiled a project in which they provide future power rankings. To accompany it, each of us is offering our thoughts on what the biggest key for future success will be to the team we cover. Houston has pieces in place to be a solid team soon. That doesn't mean things won't change a lot over the next three seasons -- in 2016 the Arian Foster and Andre Johnson eras will likely be over -- but replacing them won't be nearly as difficult as finding a consistently reliable quarterback.

You either have one, or you're looking for one. And they aren't always easy to find.

For a few years there was an overemphasis on this, given the success of men such as Peyton Manning, Tom Brady, Drew Brees and Aaron Rodgers. But all of them got beat in the playoffs this past season. The quarterback isn't the only thing that matters, but your chances for success increase significantly if you have a QB who won't cost you games.

He might be on the roster now. Perhaps Ryan Fitzpatrick will prove to be one of those late-blooming quarterbacks whose on-field decision-making improves this year. Fitzpatrick has never had a winning record, in part because of the teams around him, in part because of a preponderance of turnovers. Perhaps Tom Savage, finally staying put with one team, will develop into a long-term starter. Savage attended Rutgers, Arizona and Pittsburgh, never having a chance to get comfortable and develop. It could even be Case Keenum, who struggled mightily in his first shot at it last year, going winless in eight starts.

The point is, he hasn't been identified yet. And for the Texans to return to the top of the AFC South, he'll need to be.

Colts' biggest key to success

July, 10, 2014
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Quarterback Andrew Luck isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. He’ll remain in an Indianapolis Colts uniform for the foreseeable future.

Luck
 Owner Jim Irsay will make sure of that.

The Colts look at Luck in the same way they looked at Peyton Manning (minus having to part ways with him at some point). They want to keep Luck under center and have him lead the Colts to the Super Bowl multiple times.

If the first two years are in any indication, the Colts are in a good position to accomplish those things with Luck. The only real question -- one that has been burning since Luck’s rookie year -- is whether he will be as durable as Manning because of poor offensive line play?

Luck has been sacked so many times (73) during the first two years of his career that you’re left wondering at times how he has yet to miss any snaps in a game because of an injury. He has shaken off countless hits to lead the Colts to 22 regular-season victories and three playoff games in just two seasons.

 Still, the Colts are flirting with danger when it comes to their franchise player because of poor pass protection.

The Colts are set at tackle with Anthony Castonzo and Gosder Cherilus on the left and right side, respectively.

The interior part of the line has remained poor, however.

Luck has a new center in Khaled Holmes, who played only 12 snaps last season. Hugh Thornton is the frontrunner to retain one of the guard spots, while the other guard position is uncertain. Rookie Jack Mewhort could end up starting at guard. If so, Luck and the interior part of the offensive line will grow together. Luck, in just his third season, is the elder statesmen of the group. Holmes and Thornton are both in their second season, and Mewhort has yet to play an NFL snap.
Bortles
For the Jacksonville Jaguars to have success -- over the next three seasons and beyond -- Blake Bortles has to develop into the quarterback general manager David Caldwell envisioned during the pre-draft process.

Caldwell took Bortles with the third overall pick because he and coach Gus Bradley believed Bortles was the best quarterback in the draft and could become the cornerstone of the franchise the way Matt Ryan did in Atlanta during Caldwell’s five seasons with the Falcons. But unlike Ryan, who started 16 games as a rookie, the Jaguars want Bortles to stay off the field in 2014 and instead learn and develop behind Chad Henne.

Bortles will need to adjust to the speed of the NFL game and learn a new offense, but that’s not what is holding him back. He has some mechanical issues, specifically with his lower body, which he must improve. Bortles said the biggest issue is his footwork, particularly when he throws to his right. He’s not stepping in the direction of the throw with his left (front) foot, which leaves his upper body parallel to the line of scrimmage on his release. That’s costing him velocity and accuracy, he said.

There also are other minor technique tweaks and issues that offensive coordinator Jedd Fisch and quarterbacks coach Frank Scelfo are working on with Bortles. The plan is to use this season to fix these issues so Bortles can take the field in 2015 as a fundamentally sound quarterback who knows the offense completely.

That’s when the Jaguars will find out if Bortles has some of the other qualities needed to be a great quarterback. Can he feel and elude the rush in the pocket? When he’s under pressure, will he step up into the pocket to make the throw or bail out? Is he capable of putting a team on his back? Does he come through in big situations or does he wilt? Is he a consistent player? Do his teammates believe in him?

Those aren’t questions that can be answered now, and they might not all be answered in 2015, either. But the franchise’s future success depends on Caldwell and Bradley being able to answer “yes” to most of those questions.

Titans' biggest key to success

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With the third pick in the 1995 draft, the Houston Oilers found what everyone in the league needs: A quarterback who developed into a reliable starter and could lead a team to victory.

Locker
Steve McNair was unconventional in many ways: He had unsurpassed toughness, combined great ability to throw and run and won the respect of his team with his ability to lead it.

He had shortcomings, for sure, but ultimately, after the franchise relocated and was reinvented as the Tennessee Titans, he took it where every team wants to go. He took the Titans to Super Bowl XXXIV. In 2003, he shared the league’s MVP Award with Peyton Manning.

Since his football fade and subsequent trade to Baltimore after the 2005 season, the Titans have not found a long-term answer at quarterback. They spent the third pick in 2006 on Vince Young. They went 13-3 in 2008 with Kerry Collins at the helm. They spent the eighth pick in 2011 on Jake Locker.

But none of them has proved a long-term guy with the capabilities of McNair or any of the league’s current top quarterbacks.

The biggest issue regarding the potential for the Tennessee Titans over the next three years is quarterback. They have to find, develop and build around a guy. Maybe they already have him. Maybe they don't.

Perhaps Locker stays healthy and goes to new heights under new coach Ken Whisenhunt. If he does, the franchise would be in far better shape than conventional opinion says.

Plenty of league insiders would be surprised if Locker emerges as more than he’s shown so far, which is a player who has the ability to play well in stretches but has spotty poise and a propensity for getting hurt.

The Titans spent a sixth-round pick on a big, big-armed pocket passer, LSU's Zach Mettenberger who could be an ideal fit for Whisenhunt and develop into that long-term solution. However, Mettenberger was coming off a serious knee injury in his final year at LSU. He also has a character question, as he pleaded guilty in 2010 to two misdemeanor counts of sexual battery for groping a woman at a bar while he was a student and quarterback at Georgia.

If Locker isn’t the answer, the Titans have hope for Mettenberger. But sixth-round picks who turn into solid starters are a rarity.

In the next three seasons, the Titans simply have to identify a quarterback who can give them a chance to win and have him leading their huddle.
Mike Jones, Kevin DysonMike Zarrilli/Getty Images
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This is one of three nominations for the most memorable play in team history. We’ve already looked at Mike Renfro's non-catch catch for the Houston Oilers in the 1979 AFC championship game and the "Music City Miracle" that won the Tennessee Titans a 1999 playoff game against the Bills. Please vote for your choice as the Oilers/Titans’ most memorable play.

Score: Rams 23, Titans 16
Date: January 30, 2000 Site: Georgia Dome

The St. Louis Rams, The Greatest Show on Turf, had run out of gas.

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The Tennessee Titans had poured it on with a second-half rally but gave up a Kurt Warner-to-Isaac Bruce late bomb that allowed the Rams to take the lead in Super Bowl XXXIV.

Steve McNair guided the Titans to the Rams’ 10-yard line, where they stopped the clock with six seconds remaining. Six seconds to score a touchdown and kick an extra point to force overtime for the Super Bowl XXXIV championship.

The play call wasn’t a bad one. McNair’s favorite target, Frank Wycheck, ran a route into the end zone, and if he wasn’t open, it would mean he’d drawn attention to leave some room underneath. That’s what happened, so McNair threw to his other option, receiver Kevin Dyson, who caught the ball with a man to beat to barge into the end zone for a score.

Only that man was linebacker Mike Jones, who read the play beautifully and broke off of Wycheck and toward Dyson as the play unfolded. Jones made an excellent form tackle that left Dyson twisting and reaching fruitlessly for the plane of the end zone, just short of glory and the first overtime in Super Bowl history.

“I doubt if they'll ever be a greater play made on the final play of a Super Bowl with one second left on the clock,” Rams coach Dick Vermeil said. “It just isn't possible."

The play is certainly a memorable one for the Rams, and it’s a candidate in their three-play poll.

It’s a Titans candidate, too, and illustrates the frequent fate of the Oilers/Titans, who even in their best moments -- AFC title games in Pittsburgh in the late '70s, the playoff collapse in Buffalo and now their lone Super Bowl appearance -- came up short.
Morten AndersenAndy Lyons/Getty Images
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This is one of three nominations for the most memorable play in team history. In the next two days we'll feature: Mark Brunell's touchdown pass to Jimmy Smith to clinch the 1996 AFC Divisional playoff game over the Broncos; and David Garrard's fourth-down scramble to set up Josh Scobee's game-winning field goal in the 2007 AFC Wildcard game. Please vote for your choice as the Jaguars' most memorable play.

Score: Jaguars 19, Falcons 17
Date: Dec. 22, 1996 Site: Jacksonville Municipal Stadium

Four consecutive victories -- all by seven or fewer points -- put the Jaguars on the cusp of their first playoff appearance in just the franchise's second season. All they needed to do was beat the 3-12 Falcons at home.

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It looked like it would happen too. The Jaguars led 16-3 midway through the third quarter, thanks to Brunell's touchdown run and Mike Hollis' three field goals . But the Falcons sandwiched touchdowns around another Hollis field goal and cut the Jaguars' lead to 19-17.

Atlanta then put together what should have been a game-winning drive and set up kicker Morten Andersen with a short 30-yard field goal attempt in the final seconds. Anderson had made 59 consecutive field goals from 30 yards or closer dating back to 1989, so the Jaguars were going to be cleaning out their lockers the next day.

But the left-footed Andersen slipped when he planted his right foot, and the ball squirted left of the upright. The remaining Jaguars fans went crazy, but on the home team sideline there was a moment of disbelief.

"It almost renders me speechless," coach Tom Coughlin said after the game. "We're in the playoffs."

And boy did they make the most of that early Christmas present.

The Jaguars went to Buffalo the following week and upset the Bills in a wild-card game and then produced what is arguably the greatest victory in franchise history. The Jaguars were 14-point underdogs but upset the top-seeded Denver Broncos at Mile High Stadium.

Suddenly, they were in the AFC Championship Game.

It wouldn't have been possible without Andersen's shocking miss. To this day, Andersen still holds a place of reverence among Jaguars fans.

Surprisingly, Andersen has embraced his piece of franchise history. He served as a surprise presenter at the Florida Sports Awards show that was held in Jacksonville the summer of 1997. Andersen even pretended to slip as he was announced and made his way on stage.

The award he presented: The Jaguars' MVP, of course.

Billy MillerJames Nielsen/AFP/Getty Images
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This is one of three nominations for the most memorable play in Houston Texans history. On Monday, we featured J.J. Watt's pick-six against the Cincinnati Bengals, which helped propel the franchise to its first playoff win. On Tuesday we featured a downer -- the Rosencopter. Please vote for your choice as the Texans' most memorable play.

Score: Texans 19, Cowboys 10
Date: Sept. 8, 2002. Site: Reliant Stadium

Few franchises have a fan base that can still remember watching the organization's most important firsts. For the Texans, several came in this play.

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It was the first regular-season game in the franchise's history. They were facing the Dallas Cowboys, an instate rival they rarely face. A fan in the stands had a sign that said "1-15 is OK, just win this one."

Expectations and hopes were high for the success of No. 1 overall pick David Carr, the quarterback expected to guide them for many years to come. With the help of a solid kickoff return and a hefty penalty against the Cowboys, the Texans began the first drive in franchise history at the Cowboys' 21.

Carr threw the first pass attempt in franchise history, but it fell incomplete. James Allen rushed for 2 yards on the first carry in franchise history. Then Carr completed his first pass -- a 19-yard touchdown to Billy Miller. The Texans beat the Cowboys for the first win in franchise history.

In choosing this play, some suggested to me that while this was a very big game, the most important play came much later. Seth Payne sacked Cowboys quarterback Quincy Carter in the fourth quarter for a safety. That play didn't literally end the game, but it sealed the teams' fate.

It was a tough call, but ultimately I went with the touchdown pass because of its unprecedented nature. The first time something happens, it leaves a mark for better or worse.
Peyton ManningAP Photo/Michael Conroy
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 This is the last of three nominations for the most memorable plays in Indianapolis Colts history dating to when they moved to Indianapolis in 1984. The first nomination was second-year quarterback Andrew Luck leading the Colts from 28 points down in the second half to beat Kansas City in the AFC playoffs last season. The second was cornerback Marlin Jackson's interception of New England quarterback Tom Brady with 18 seconds left to seal the Colts' 18-point comeback in the AFC Championship Game in January 2007.

Score: Colts 34, Chargers 31
Date: Dec. 26, 2004. Site: RCA Dome

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It didn't seem like Peyton Manning would break Dan Marino's season touchdown passing record on this day. For 59 minutes you thought Manning would have to wait until the season finale against the Denver Broncos to pass the record.

Manning was untouchable by defenders all season leading up to the Week 16 game against San Diego.

But the Chargers sacked him four times, forced two fumbles and intercepted him once.

With the game on the line, though, Manning did what he does best: Be clutch.

Manning shook off the play call that came in through his headset and decided to make a backyard play call to receiver Brandon Stokley.

Manning told Stokley to run a post route.

Lined up in the slot, Stokley threw the defense off balance by faking a fade to the corner and cutting back inside on the post to catch the 21-yard touchdown pass from Manning. Chargers safety Terrence Kiel was faked out so badly by Stokley looking as though he was going to run the corner route that he fell in the end zone.

"You think the NFL is real complex," Manning told reporters after the game. "But it turns into street ball real quick."

The touchdown pass was the 49th of the season thrown by Manning, breaking the record set by Marino in 1984.

"It says a lot about Peyton that here we are, the game on the line, and he calls a play we've never run before," Stokley told reporters. "He calls a post. I just didn't want it to hit me in the face."

Manning spent the weeks leading up to that game talking about how playoff seeding was more important than passing Marino's record. The Colts beat the Chargers in overtime.

"At the time I threw it, there wasn't a lot of emotion for me, because if we don't get the 2-point conversion, this is a down locker room right now," Manning said after the game. "The fact that it happened, we won the game ... . It sure made for an exciting day."

 
As the Tennessee Titans have been treading water in recent seasons, flirting with mediocrity, their fans have continued to buy tickets while not always showing up.

Why they haven't stopped paying for tickets they are not using is a mystery I attempted to solve back in December. Those people invested in personal seat licenses. If you cease to buy tickets connected to those licenses, you sacrifice the licenses.

You can sell PSLs, but there is no market for them now. If the Titans get good, there will be a market, but many of the people who have the tickets will want to use them again. It's a brilliant device that keeps the team in position to build on a technical sellout streak that includes every game played in the building.

And they are on track to build on it further.

Don MacLachlan, the team's top non-football executive in Nashville, said the Titans' season-ticket renewal rate was 98 percent.

That amounts to about 60,000 of LP Field's 69,143 seats.

From the start, the Titans have sold at least 2,500 tickets per game on a game-by-game basis, so as not to leave out fans who can afford a game or two but not a PSL or season tickets. Other tickets that are left are sold in group sales, given to the visiting team or attached to sponsors or promotional programs.

"We're thrilled with the response we've had from season-ticket holders," MacLachlan said. "It's a 12-month process, engaging with season-ticket holders. We're encouraged by the enhancements to LP Field made under Tommy Smith's direction and there will be a different look in a lot of different ways in the stadium."

Wi-Fi will be available for everyone when the Titans open the preseason against the Packers on Aug. 9. The team has changed concessionaires as well, addressing longtime complaints about the available food.
Jimmy SmithJamie Squire/Getty Images
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This is one of three nominations for the most memorable play in Jacksonville Jaguars history. On Wednesday, we’ll feature David Garrard’s fourth-down scramble to set up Josh Scobee’s game-winning field goal in the 2007 AFC wild-card playoffs. On Monday, we featured Morten Andersen’s missed field goal in the 1996 regular-season finale that sent the Jaguars to the playoffs. Please vote for your choice as the Jaguars’ most memorable play.

Score: Jaguars 30, Broncos 27
Date: Jan. 4, 1997 Site: Mile High Stadium

You could argue that the Jaguars didn’t belong in the playoffs in just their second year of existence. They got in only because Morten Andersen slipped and missed a chip-shot 30-yard field goal in the 1996 regular-season finale.

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And you also could argue the Jaguars got a bit lucky in their 30-27 AFC wild-card victory over host Buffalo. Mark Brunell threw an end-zone interception and had another pick returned for a touchdown, but the Jaguars turned a Jim Kelly fumble into the game-winning points.

But you can’t debate that the Jaguars pulled off one of the biggest upsets in playoff history by beating the top-seeded and 14-point favorite Broncos to earn a trip to the AFC Championship Game. The Jaguars outgained the Broncos by 92 yards, didn’t turn the ball over and won the game, thanks to two of the franchise’s greatest players.

The Jaguars trailed 12-0 into the second quarter but then scored on six consecutive possessions. The last in that streak was the most important because it gave the Jaguars a 10-point lead with 3:39 remaining.

The touchdown came on a play that the Jaguars had run countless times: a fade pass to Jimmy Smith. From the Denver 16-yard line, the left-handed Brunell took a three-step drop and lofted the ball down the sideline toward Smith, who had gotten behind cornerback Tory James. Smith caught the ball three steps into the end zone before free safety Tim Hauck could get over to help.

Brunell threw 195 touchdown passes (11 in the playoffs) and Smith caught 74 touchdown passes (seven in the playoffs) in their NFL careers, but none may have been bigger than that one. That touchdown, one of Smith’s three catches in the game, gave the Jaguars a 10-point cushion.

The Broncos scored their second touchdown of the fourth quarter on John Elway’s 15-yard pass to Ed McCaffrey with 1:50 remaining to pull to within 30-27, but Jason Elam’s onside kick attempt traveled only 5 yards and the Jaguars ran out the clock.
Kevin DysonAllen Kee/Getty Images
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This is one of three nominations for the most memorable play in team history. We’ve already looked at Mike Renfro's non-catch catch in the 1979 AFC Championship Game. We will also feature Kevin Dyson's desperate, unsuccessful reach for the end zone that came up a yard short of forcing overtime as time expired on Super Bowl XXXIV. Please vote for your choice as the Oilers/Titans’ most memorable play.

Score: Titans 22, Bills 16
Date: January 8, 2000 Site: Adelphia Coliseum

As a head coach, Jeff Fisher prided himself on having his team ready for everything.

In a playoffs-or-pink-slips season, the franchise's first as the reinvented Tennessee Titans, Fisher got to offer the best possible example of that.

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The Titans fell behind 16-15 with 16 seconds left in a wild-card playoff game after Steve Christie hit a 41-yard field goal.

The Titans responded with “Home Run Throwback,” a play designed by special teams coach Alan Lowry. It called for Frank Wycheck to field an expected squib kick, sell the coverage team he was returning it to the right, and then whirling and throwing a lateral to Derrick Mason.

Mason was out with a concussion, however, and his backup for the play, safety Anthony Dorsett, was also unable to play.

Kevin Dyson was quickly coached up to take on the role.

It wasn’t Wycheck, but Lorenzo Neal who fielded the kick. He handed it back to Wycheck, who sold the fake and made the throw. Dyson came back to collect the low throw, turned and sprinted into wide-open space with a convoy of blockers ahead of him. He pulled up and eased into the end zone for a 75-yard touchdown.

It withstood a replay review by referee Phil Luckett, and provided the winning margin for a team that went on to make the franchise’s lone Super Bowl appearance.

The Music City Miracle added to the lore of Buffalo sports teams coming up short, while creating an incredible story in Tennessee in just the ninth meaningful game played in the stadium built to draw the Oilers from Houston to Nashville.

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