Wrapping up the Red Sox-Rays ALDS

October, 9, 2013
10/09/13
2:33
PM ET
A few final reflections on the Red Sox-Rays ALDS:

• The Red Sox outscored the Rays 25-12, hit .300 with runners in scoring position to Tampa Bay’s .179, and stole six bases to the Rays’ one.

Jacoby Ellsbury, Shane Victorino and David Ortiz (Nos. 1, 2 and 4 in the lineup) were a combined 20 for 45 with 13 runs scored and eight RBIs in the ALDS. Each of the three hit .385 or better.

• Boston took advantage of every opportunity to get on base and every opportunity to score, capitalizing on not just hits, but defensive miscues and wild pitches.

Victorino tied a record for a single postseason by being hit by four pitches. Rookie shortstop Xander Bogaerts came off the bench to draw two big walks and score two key runs in the series-clinching win. (He was only the second reserve player with a multi-walk, multi-run game in the postseason, joining Benny Agbayani of the 1999 Mets).

• The Red Sox drew eight walks, and the Rays did not draw any, in Boston’s Game 4 victory. It was the fifth postseason game in major-league history in which one team walked eight or more times while their opponent did not draw a free pass, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. The last such game was Game 5 of the 2011 ALCS between the Rangers (8 BB) and Tigers (0 BB).

• Bogaerts entered in the seventh inning and ended up walking twice and scoring twice in Game 4. He is the first player in postseason history with 2 walks and 2 runs as a sub in a 9-inning game. Mets outfielder Benny Agbayani in 1999 NLCS Game 6 was 1-for-1, with 2 walks and 2 runs off the bench in an 11-inning game.

Craig Breslow struck out the first 4 batters he faced in Game 4. In 419 career regular-season games (and 2 previous postseason games), he only struck out 4 batters once.

His value is in that he’s a lefty who can get right-handed hitters out. Right-handed hitters went 2 for 10 against Breslow in the ALDS, basically a match for their .208 batting average against him in the regular season.

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