SEC: Mississippi State Bulldogs

Five keys for Miss. State-LSU

September, 19, 2014
Sep 19
2:00
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BATON ROUGE, La. -- Mississippi State (3-0) will attempt to earn its first win at Tiger Stadium in eons when it visits No. 8 LSU (3-0) in Saturday night’s SEC opener for both teams.

Let’s look at five key storylines for the Bulldogs and Tigers as Saturday’s kickoff approaches.

Defending Dak: On Thursday we took a look at the numerous ways that Mississippi State quarterback Dak Prescott can affect the game. Last week against South Alabama, the Heisman Trophy dark horse became one of only two SEC players in the last decade to have two games where they ran for a touchdown, passed for a touchdown and caught a touchdown pass (teammate Jameon Lewis is the other).

[+] EnlargeDak Prescott
Michael Chang/Getty ImagesKeeping QB Dak Prescott contained in the pocket will be a priority for the LSU defense.
Prescott is scary as a runner -- in fact, he’s eighth in the SEC with an average of 91 rushing yards per game -- and scrambler once a pass play breaks down. Like it did successfully against Texas A&M's Johnny Manziel, the Tigers’ defensive front must contain Prescott in the pocket in order to limit the havoc he creates once he opts to tuck it and run. He rushed for 103 yards against LSU last season, including a 28-yard touchdown scramble after fleeing the pocket.

However, Prescott was only 9-for-20 for 106 yards and an interception against the Tigers’ secondary -- and that bunch has only improved since then. ESPN Stats & Information reports that LSU has limited opposing quarterbacks to an 11.2 Total QBR, which is the best for any FBS pass defense. The Tigers are allowing a 40.2 completion percentage and 3.5 yards per pass attempt, both of which rank second nationally.

With that in mind, if the Tigers’ front can force Prescott to try to beat them with his arm, they would probably consider that a win.

Battle of front sevens: Although containing Prescott will be a challenge, perhaps the biggest test for LSU on Saturday will be along the line of scrimmage.

LSU’s defensive front has dominated since getting gashed early by Wisconsin’s Melvin Gordon & Co., but Mississippi State’s running game will provide the toughest challenge since Gordon for the Tigers’ interior line. And State boasts an impressive defensive front seven that could overwhelm what has been a so-so LSU offensive line.

The Bulldogs’ defense ranks second nationally with 29 tackles for loss, fourth with 18 pass breakups and eighth with 11 sacks. Defensive end Preston Smith has been named SEC Defensive Lineman of the Week in all three weeks this season and linebacker Benardrick McKinney (20 tackles, five tackles for loss) is an impact player. The Bulldogs are surrendering just 80.3 rushing yards per game and 2.3 yards per carry, both of which rank second in the SEC.

That doesn’t bode well for an LSU offense that clearly wants to pound the run. No SEC team has more rushing attempts than LSU’s 157, but the Tigers’ average of 4.3 yards per carry ranks 10th in the conference.

Throwing deep: Then again, if the Anthony Jennings-to-Travin Dural show makes an encore, LSU might not be in such a bad position after all. Mississippi State’s secondary has been susceptible to the big play -- in the UAB game alone, the Blazers passed for 435 yards and had touchdown passes of 88, 81 and 75 yards -- and is surrendering 311.7 passing yards per game.

Jennings connected with Dural for an 80-yard touchdown against Wisconsin and a school-record 94-yard touchdown against Sam Houston State, but Dural has accounted for 58 percent of LSU’s passing yardage (370 of 642 yards) to date. Rest assured that Mississippi State will do its best to force Jennings to spread the ball around to other receivers so that Dural doesn’t take over again.

Eliminating big plays: Mississippi State’s offense has been remarkably productive on first down. According to ESPN Stats & Information, the Bulldogs have an FBS-high 17 plays on first downs that covered 20 yards or more.

That creates an interesting matchup, as LSU has been stingy about allowing big plays on any down. John Chavis' defense is among three from Power Five conferences that have not allowed a completion covering 15 yards or more. LSU's sports information staff discovered that Louisiana-Monroe’s longest play last Saturday (a 12-yard completion) was the worst in a game against LSU since Mississippi State’s longest play in a 1971 loss also covered just 12 yards.

Mississippi State has spread around its big-play production. Prescott, Lewis, Josh Robinson (who is sixth in the SEC with 96 rushing ypg), Nick Griffin and Damian Williams all have runs of 20 yards or more, while 10 receivers have catches of at least 20 yards.

In contrast, LSU has only seven players who have caught a pass, period, much less one that went for a 20-yard gain. Aside from Dural, only John Diarse and running back Leonard Fournette have receptions that covered at least 20 yards.

Series history: Recent history certainly does not look too pleasant for MSU.

LSU has won 14 in a row against the Bulldogs and 21 of the last 22. State hasn’t beaten LSU since 1999 in Starkville and hasn’t won at Tiger Stadium since 1991. LSU’s average margin of victory over State in four home games since Les Miles became the Tigers’ coach is 20.75 points.

All of that said, coaches on both sides have emphasized that history has nothing to do with what will happen at Tiger Stadium on Saturday night. And while that’s true, the historical trends reinforce why Tiger Stadium developed a reputation as an unpleasant destination for opponents. With its wins coming against Southern Miss, UAB and South Alabama – teams ranked 120th, 87th and 94th in ESPN’s Football Power Index – State likely must play its best game of the season in order to leave Death Valley with a victory.
STARKVILLE, Miss. -- It wasn’t in this office, all shiny and new.

It wasn’t in the glossy chair with the comfortable white leather he sits in today.

It wasn’t behind the massive desk to his right, the one surrounded by commemorative footballs from games won and Egg Bowls remembered.

No, it wasn’t here overlooking the practice field that he had to be rude and stubborn with some in his administration. This impeccable $25 million facility didn’t exist back then.

[+] EnlargeDan Mullen
AP Photo/Butch DillDan Mullen has worked hard to change the mindset at Mississippi State.
Dan Mullen had to kick people out of his old office to get a new one.

“Early on people would say, ‘We can’t,’ and I’d throw them out,” he said.

Coming from a championship-winning program at Florida, Mullen couldn’t stomach the self-imposed limitations so many at Mississippi State had become accustomed to. Football seasons here were supposed to end in late November. Beating Ole Miss was the only tangible priority. Going to a bowl game was an afterthought.

The ceiling bothered him so much, he decided to tear the whole thing down.

“It was all the mindset,” he said, thinking back on his start late in 2008. “It was everything we can’t do. ‘We’re Mississippi State so we can’t do these things.’ If they wanted to go positive, ‘We can only do this because we’re Mississippi State.’

“To me, that’s not acceptable.”

Admittedly, that attitude was a little abrasive. After someone was thrown out, another person would have to clean up the mess and translate the message.

As Mullen said, “I don’t sugarcoat things well.” But when you’re attempting to rebuild a program that went 21-42 in the seasons prior to your arrival, how can you?

“You had to be brash because people had never heard or seen that here before,” Mullen said. “I’m not a softball pitcher. I don’t throw up the little easy ones in there. I’m going to come hit you square in the face with what I want to get done.”



It worked.

If it hadn’t, this week wouldn’t matter.

As Mississippi State prepares for its Saturday night tilt at No. 8 LSU, there’s a sense of optimism that maybe this is the year things finally change in Starkville. The Bulldogs are 3-0, possess a dark-horse Heisman Trophy contender at quarterback in Dak Prescott and have a defense that is two deep at every position.

Instead of people saying “We can’t” they’re saying “Why not?”

Rankings be damned.

“We’re projected to lose every game,” senior safety Jay Hughes said. “It’s nothing new to us.”

That chip on players’ shoulders? It’s more like a boulder.

Mississippi State doesn’t have the prestige. It doesn’t have the history of winning big games. The level of talent just isn’t the same.

“I know you look and say, ‘They’re a young team this year,’” Mullen said of LSU. “They’re a young team with five-star starters, five-star backups and five-star third-stringers.”

But so what?

“We’re a bunch of three- and two-star guys,” Hughes said. “We don’t really have stars here. We work really hard. I’ve been here for five years and my body is hurting.”

In that time, he’s seen change take place. He’s seen his coach be stubborn to make it happen.

“You have to step out on a limb to get the results,” Hughes said. “That’s what he did.”

A win over LSU would mean faith rewarded.

“It would set our season off,” running back Nick Griffin said. “We’re feeling confident we can do it and make a little history of our own.”



What would a win mean to Mullen?

“It would mean we have a very nice bye week,” he said. “You know what? We’re in the SEC West. You’re going to have to win a lot.”

By saying that, you know things have truly changed at Mississippi State. A win at LSU wouldn’t be a season maker, it would be a season starter. It would be the first step in the program’s hopes of reaching an SEC title.

And when’s the last time you heard that coming out of Starkville?

“You look at great programs, they embrace those expectations,” Mullen said. “If you go to LSU and Alabama and Florida and Georgia and Michigan and Ohio State, Southern Cal, they’re here to win a championship this year.

“When I said it at Mississippi State, it was laughed upon. Now when we say that, everyone kind of thinks the same way, ‘That’s what we’re here for.’”

Saying it is nice. Showing it is better.

Mississippi State has a lot to prove against LSU. It’s been 15 years since the Bulldogs have beaten the Tigers.

“This is what counts this week,” Mullen said. “Everything about it -- the demeanor, the attitude, the excitement, the focus -- all of that has changed.

“I don’t know if there’s a more challenging game than at LSU on Saturday night,” he added, “but it’s something we have to do to put ourselves in contention to compete for a championship.”

As Mullen said, “There is no ceiling.”

Now Mississippi State must see how high it can go.

Film review: Defending Dak Prescott

September, 18, 2014
Sep 18
2:30
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BATON ROUGE, La. -- LSU’s defense will face no shortage of dual-threat quarterbacks in SEC play, and it will attempt to contain one of the best -- Mississippi State’s Dak Prescott -- right out of the gates in Saturday’s conference opener.

Prescott is a dark-horse candidate in the Heisman Trophy race because of the multiple ways he can affect the game, as evidenced by last week’s win against South Alabama, when he threw a touchdown pass, ran for a touchdown and caught a touchdown pass on a trick play.

As a passer, Prescott (43-for-72, 696 yards, nine TDs, two INTs in 2014) is effective, but it’s his running ability that makes him especially scary. He is eighth in the SEC with an average of 91.0 rushing yards per game, and he’s averaging 6.8 yards per rushing attempt thus far.

That run-pass combination will be tough to defend, as LSU coach Les Miles is well aware. Miles called Prescott “as good of a player as there is in his position in our conference.”

Let’s take a look at some of the issues LSU must contend with in defending Mississippi State’s quarterback:

RUNS WITH POWER

The multidimensional quarterbacks LSU will face down the road are more from the finesse mold -- think Auburn’s Nick Marshall, Texas A&M’s Kenny Hill and Ole Miss’ Bo Wallace -- than the power mold. Like previous SEC stars Cam Newton and Tim Tebow, the 230-pound Prescott is content to run over tacklers instead of around them.

“I don't know exactly how fast he is, but he carves through the ground very quickly, and when you go to tackle him, you better hit him hard,” Miles said. ”You’d better take him off his feet because he's just a big, physical kid.”

Florida fans might recognize this Tebow-style play from Dan Mullen’s time as the Gators’ offensive coordinator. In last season’s South Carolina game, Prescott takes a shotgun snap, follows a block from running back LaDarius Perkins, and plows between left guard and left tackle for a 1-yard touchdown.

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We could pull any number of short-yardage Prescott clips as visual evidence that there’s more to the Tebow comparison than their matching No. 15 jerseys. Most defenders failed to drag either of them down with arm tackles.

BREAKING FROM POCKET

In addition to power, Prescott runs with impressive speed. Check out this 28-yard touchdown scramble from last season’s LSU game.

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LSU defensive end Jermauria Rasco destroys left tackle Charles Siddoway with a spin move and has a clear shot at Prescott, but the Mississippi State quarterback steps forward into the pocket and slips between Ego Ferguson and Danielle Hunter into the open field. Then it becomes a footrace, and he sprints away from linebacker D.J. Welter for a first-quarter touchdown.

LSU’s defensive front seven will certainly have its hands full trying to contain Prescott once he scrambles after initially dropping back to pass.

“It looks like he’s got even bigger since last year, but we’re ready to play physical and run fast. That’s basically what we have to do to prepare for him,” LSU outside linebacker Lamar Louis said.

RUNNING GAME IS DANGEROUS

Prescott’s running ability -- and Mississippi State’s running game in general -- makes defenses that sell out to stop the run susceptible to the occasional big passing play.

Take this 35-yard touchdown pass to Fred Ross from the 2014 opener against Southern Miss. When cornerback Jomez Applewhite abandons Ross to blitz off the edge, Prescott easily hits Ross several yards away from safety Emmanuel Johnson, who is slow in coverage after Prescott fakes a handoff in the backfield. All Ross has to do is make a wide-open catch and break a Johnson tackle attempt at the 5 and he’s in the end zone.

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The threat of Prescott runs and similar run fakes will test LSU’s defensive discipline. If Prescott catches defensive backs looking into the backfield like this, a big play for State might follow.

PRESSURING HIS THROWS

No quarterback likes to throw under pressure. Prescott is not a pro-style passer, but he’s capable of making some impressive throws if he has time to survey the field.

Here’s a pass to Fred Brown from last week’s win against South Alabama that Prescott completes despite cornerback Montell Garner's attempt to disrupt Brown’s route by holding him. Prescott places the ball perfectly over safety Roman Buchanan for a 36-yard gain.

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Earlier in the South Alabama game, Prescott has plenty of time to zip a 15-yard touchdown pass over the middle to Malcolm Johnson where safety Terrell Brigham has no chance to deflect or intercept the pass.

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Thus, LSU’s pass rushers know it will be incumbent on them to keep Prescott in the pocket and make him uncomfortable when he attempts to throw.

“With them having a really good offensive line, we have to make sure that we just attack the line of scrimmage and make sure that we stay in our gaps and clog the holes” LSU defensive tackle Christian LaCouture said.

According to ESPN Stats and Information, Prescott has handled the blitz fairly well -- he has five touchdown passes and no interceptions against five or more pass rushers -- although his Total QBR against the blitz is just 48.5. He’ll definitely face extra rushers Saturday, like when defensive back Dwayne Thomas blitzes from LSU’s “Mustang” package.

Regardless of who applies the pressure, the Tigers' rushers will greatly help their cause if they get a hand in Prescott’s line of vision. Take this throw from last season’s 59-26 win in Starkville. Hunter gets in Prescott’s face before he overthrows Jameon Lewis, and Tre'Davious White intercepts the bad throw at the Mississippi State 45. His 40-yard return to the 5 sets up Jeremy Hill's touchdown run on the next play that essentially puts away the LSU win.

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COLUMBIA, S.C. -- South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier beamed when he sprang into his postgame press conference room Saturday evening. He had just watched his Gamecocks shock No. 6 Georgia -- the team picked by many to represent the SEC in the College Football Playoff after just one game -- 38-35 with a gutsy, yet controversial, call to go for it on fourth-and-inches.

[+] EnlargeSteve Spurrier
Jeremy Brevard/USA TODAY SportsSteve Spurrier again got the best of Georgia and showed that South Carolina will make noise in the SEC Eastern Division.
The Head Ball Coach, who was labeled "done" by some after an unconvincing 1-1 start that featured an epic beat down from Texas A&M, was smiling once again after besting his favorite SEC pinata -- Georgia.

Spurrier got his 16th win over Georgia -- the most by any coach over the Dawgs -- and his fourth out of the last five meetings. He and his team also showed that what we thought of South Carolina heading into last weekend wasn't exactly true. There are still issues with the Gamecocks, especially on defense, but we were quick to write off the very team picked in the preseason to win the SEC Eastern Division.

"This is a good one," Spurrier said of Saturday's win. "I knew we had a good chance to beat them when I heard [ESPN radio host Paul] Finebaum picked them [Georgia] to win by about 25 points. He picked Alabama to beat Oklahoma by 25 [in last season’s Allstate Sugar Bowl] too. I said, 'We gotta chance tonight then.'”

Yeah, all that negativity we showed the Gamecocks last week didn't go unnoticed in Columbia.

“I’m not going to lie and tell you that I wasn’t watching TV, seeing people say that Georgia was the No. 1 team, have them winning the playoff," South Carolina running back Mike Davis said. "Watching GameDay and seeing all those guys pick UGA, and having [ESPN college football analyst] Kirk [Herbstreit] being the only one who said we were going to win. This is a big confidence booster for our team.”

So South Carolina isn't dead, and it's clear that the SEC East is still very much wide open.

What else were we quick to assume about the SEC?

1. Jake Coker isn't ready: We all thought Coker would be Alabama's starting quarterback. Well, it's Florida week and veteran Blake Sims is very much the guy and has a big lead on Coker. Unlike Coker, Sims is limited with his arm, but he's done nothing to lose the starting job, while Coker has done nothing to take it.

2. Arkansas isn't the pushover it has been: We figured it'd be another ho-hum year for the Razorbacks. Then they challenged Auburn in the first half of their opener and literally ran over Nicholls State and Texas Tech with 933 rushing yards and 13 touchdowns on the ground. Arkansas looks like it can run on anyone.

3. Vanderbilt is in trouble: We thought the talent was still there for Vanderbilt to make another quality run under Derek Mason in his first year with the Commodores. Well, we aren't sure what's up, but the Commodores are lucky to be 1-2 at this point. After getting outscored 78-10 against Temple and Ole Miss, the Dores needed a last-second missed field goal to escape the UMass game.

4. Florida's defense has to climb back to elite status: We questioned Florida's offense, which still has concerns, but we didn't press the defense. Well, it turns out that there are actually real concerns with this younger unit. Coverage breakdowns fueled 369 Kentucky passing yards and three touchdowns. Also, can anyone besides Dante Fowler Jr. rush the passer?

5. Mississippi State's secondary has questions: It's early, but the Bulldogs have had issues in the back end of their defense. Through three games, the Bulldogs have allowed an average of 311.7 passing yards per game. Corner Taveze Calhoun, who garnered tons of preseason praise, and the guys around him at corner and safety have really underperformed to start the season.

6. Texas A&M is still pretty good: Wasn't this team supposed to take a few steps back without Johnny Manziel? Well, the Aggies didn't get the memo. Texas A&M upset South Carolina 52-28 to start the year, the defense looks better and quarterback Kenny Hill leads the SEC with 1,094 yards and has 11 touchdowns. I can't believe someone didn't think an A&M quarterback would throw for 3,000 yards this season ...

7. Kentucky can upset someone: If you watched any part of Florida's triple-overtime win over Kentucky, you'd know the Wildcats are better than they have been in years. Patrick Towles threw for almost 400 yards on the Gators with a handful of playmakers to use that this team hasn't had in a while. Also, that defense is much better with Bud Dupree and Za'Darius Smith battling for the top defensive end duo in the SEC.

8. Tennessee doesn't have a quarterback issue: We thought there was too much uncertainty surrounding Tennessee's quarterbacks. Well, we were wrong, as Justin Worley has been solid, making tremendous throws through the first two games. He struggled against Oklahoma but is averaging 240 yards per game and has six touchdown passes.

9. Missouri isn't ready to take a step back: We thought there were a lot of questions for Mizzou on both sides of the ball, and there still might be, but this team isn't ready to bow out in the SEC. The competition hasn't been great, but Mizzou has done exactly what's been asked, outscoring teams 125-52.

10. Leonard Fournette isn't Michael Jordan ... yet: We thought Fournette would have at least 1,000 rushing yards and, like, 20 touchdowns at this point. What a disappointment! It's a long season folks, but Fournette is still learning and has just 162 yards and two touchdowns. He'll be great, but we actually have to be patient with him.

SEC morning links

September, 18, 2014
Sep 18
8:00
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1. The big storyline Wednesday wasn’t from the SEC. It was from the ACC. Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston, a name SEC fans surely know by now, will sit the first half against Clemson for yet another off-field incident. ESPN’s Mark Schlabach summed it up well in his column: “Funny, the last time I checked, you can’t spell Jameis without ‘me’ and ‘I.’” This got me thinking, though. What player in the SEC could their team not afford to lose for a half? Auburn already showed it can win without its quarterback Nick Marshall, who sat out the first half against Arkansas. Losing Todd Gurley would be rough, but Georgia has a full stable of running backs behind him. Maybe Amari Cooper at Alabama? Or how about on the other side of the ball with Vernon Hargreaves III at Florida? The two will be squaring off this Saturday. But what do you think? Who’s the SEC’s most indispensable player?

2. Auburn coach Gus Malzahn will turn 49 next month, one year away from the big 5-0, but that’s nothing compared to his coaching counterpart Thursday night. Bill Snyder, who is in his second stint at Kansas State, is 74 years old. The stadium his team plays in is already named after him. Not a lot of coaches can say that. As for Malzahn, he doesn’t see himself coaching at 74 because according to him, “college football ages you in dog years.” It’s not all that uncommon in the SEC, though. South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier turns 70 in April, and others -- including Nick Saban (Alabama), Gary Pinkel (Missouri), and Les Miles (LSU) are all over the age of 60. My guess is that Malzahn will be coaching in the NFL long before he reaches that age, but you never know.

3. It’s been awhile since Mississippi State last beat LSU -- 15 years to be exact. In fact, the Bulldogs have never beat Les Miles since he’s been in Baton Rouge, but that doesn’t mean it won’t happen this season. On Wednesday, Miles called this Mississippi State team “as talented and as complete” as any Mississippi State team he’s coached against. He’s not taking this game lightly, and neither will the fans. You can bet that the newly renovated Tiger Stadium will be rocking Saturday night. There are games -- like Sam Houston State and Louisiana Monroe -- and then there are SEC games. This weekend marks the first SEC game.

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videoSTARKVILLE, Miss. -- “You’re not going to Mississippi State unless you can tell me why,” Peggy Prescott said to her son late one night during his senior year of high school. Dak, her youngest, wanted to play college football in Starkville, but he was only 17 years old at the time. Because of that, he couldn’t sign his own letter of intent. Mom held the keys to his future and she wasn’t going down without a fight.

Raising three boys on her own in Louisiana, Peggy needed to be heard. Her whistle, how it cut through the crowd from the bleachers to the football field below, is still ringing in her sons’ ears today, 11 months after she passed away from a year-and-a-half-long bout with cancer.

She loved football and was there for every one of her sons’ games. Before she passed, she broke down and got her first tattoo: a football on her ankle with the number three written inside it for her boys.

“With the cannon going off on the football field and people yelling you could still hear my mom's sharp whistle over everybody,” Tad, her eldest, recalled. “She was not the mom that sat under a blanket and kept her mouth shut the entire game. You could hear her screaming, 'Hit him! Get your hands off him!’”

[+] EnlargeDak Prescott
Michael Chang/Getty ImagesDak Prescott knows he has something to prove on Saturday against LSU.
It was how she felt about Mississippi State, too. Starkville wasn’t allowed to have Dak, she thought. The seven-and-a-half-hour drive across state lines was too much for her. The two-and-a-half hour trip to LSU felt much more reasonable.

Besides, it was LSU that recruited Peggy the hardest, 10 times harder than Dak, he said.

“They knew whatever Mom said was going to matter,” Dak said. “They battled her and battled her, but I wanted to be an honest guy, and when I give my word I’m committed.”

That decision didn’t come easily. Dak had to keep his mother up until 2 a.m. to finally convince her why Mississippi State and coach Dan Mullen were the right choice.

“I didn’t want to go to a team that had already won a championship and had been in the top 10 every year,” Dak explained. “I wanted to help a team grow and be a part of something special, and I thought Mississippi State had the best chance at the time.”

LSU, he felt, was telling him what he wanted to hear. Mullen said redshirting his first year on campus was a possibility while Miles told him he wanted him to play right away, he said.

“I feel like I’m a smart guy and I can see through bull crap,” Dak said.

“I wanted to get to where LSU and all those other schools were and beat them.”

On Saturday, he’ll have that chance.

If only Peggy could be in Baton Rouge to see it.

For the first time in a long time, there’s hope among Mississippi State fans that beating LSU is a real possibility. The Tigers have won 14 consecutive times in the series, after all.

But the Bulldogs are 3-0 themselves, the defense is as deep as it’s ever been and Dak is quietly building a case for the Heisman Trophy. He’s an outsider at this point, but his numbers speak volumes: 43 of 72 passing for 696 yards and nine touchdowns. He’s rushed for 273 yards and two touchdowns. And for good measure, he’s also caught a touchdown pass.

Between his number (15) and his charismatic leadership, there have been comparisons to Tim Tebow. Mullen, after all, was Tebow’s offensive coordinator at Florida when he won the Heisman in 2007.

“He’s evolved,” said safety Jay Hughes, who hosted Dak and his mother on their official way back when. “Just his knowledge and understanding of the game have gone to another level.”

“I don’t even think he knows how good he can be,” he added.

But while putting up big numbers against LSU would surely catapult Dak into the Heisman conversation, Mullen doesn’t want him thinking that way.

“There will be plays he has to make to win the game for us, but not every play,” Mullen said. “Disperse the ball, get it to the playmakers, lead the offense, and then when there are plays to be made go make them.”

Dak insists he’s ready to do just that. He knows Tiger Stadium will be loud, but he’s excited for it. With more than 20 family members expected to be on hand, he knows, “All eyes will be on us and LSU this time.”

The same quarterback who turned down LSU and convinced his mother it was the right decision is now returning to his home state with hopes of an upset. Mississippi State is ready to break through, he thinks. Now is the time to prove it.

“There’s nothing like starting 1-0,” he said. “Starting off against a top-10 opponent would be a great chance to put ourselves ahead and let the nation know.”

And in some way, it would let Dak know, too.

A win would do more than lift Mississippi State in the SEC West. A win would do more than lift Dak’s Heisman chances.

A win would make Dak right about that 2 a.m. conversation so many years ago. A win would be the perfect way to say to his mother that leaving home and helping build something in Starkville was well worth it.

SEC morning links

September, 17, 2014
Sep 17
8:00
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Much was made of offensive coordinator Kurt Roper's hire at Florida this offseason. He was brought to inject life into a struggling unit and so far, he has done that -- hiccups in the first half against Kentucky notwithstanding. The true measuring stick for the Gators' offensive progress will come this week at Alabama. Fortunately for the Gators, Roper has experience against the Crimson Tide, though it wasn't a good experience (Duke lost to Alabama 62-13 in 2010 when Roper was with the Blue Devils). These are different circumstances and Roper has Will Muschamp -- who knows Nick Saban well from his days as an assistant on his staff -- as a resource. While Florida still has plenty of room for improvement, Saturday's clash in Tuscaloosa will be revealing when it comes to understanding how far the Gators' offense has come in a short time.

Texas A&M hasn't taken a step back -- like many thought they would in the post Johnny Manziel-era -- and contributions from the Aggies' freshmen is a big part of that equation. So far, 14 true freshmen from the Aggies' fourth-ranked 2014 recruiting class have seen the field and several have become impact players immediately: defensive end Myles Garrett, safety Armani Watts and receiver Speedy Noil, just to name a few. The Aggies' move to the SEC did quite a bit for the program in terms of visibility, fundraising, image but the impact has probably been felt most in recruiting, where the Aggies have hauled in two consecutive top-10 recruiting classes and are on track for a third straight this fall.

Vanderbilt started three different quarterbacks in their first three games, and suffice it to say, it has been an adventure. Against Massachusetts, true freshman Wade Freebeck started but Patton Robinette -- the Game 1 starter -- came in later to lead a comeback victory. What to make of the way coach Derek Mason has handled quarterbacks? It certainly has been a guessing game for fans and observers. This week, Mason said Robinette is starting and he's sticking with him until there's a reason to go another direction. Here's hoping that is the case. Robinette was pulled quickly in the opener against Temple but perhaps gained confidence from his relief performance last week. Confidence can be a fragile thing with a quarterback since it's a position of high visibility. Hopefully Mason can help Robinette keep that confidence up and stick with him through thick and thin, which would show the rest of the team that it should be confident in him as well.

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SEC Heisman watch: Week 3

September, 16, 2014
Sep 16
12:00
PM ET
Despite Saturday's loss to South Carolina, Todd Gurley is still among the favorites to win the Heisman Trophy this season.

Georgia's stud running back did just about everything he could have to win that game Saturday. He broke through tackles, changed the field on a dime during a wild 17-yard gain, drug Gamecocks -- likely kicking and screaming -- on his back and legs, and flattened guys in his way inside Williams-Brice Stadium.

[+] EnlargeTodd Gurley
Streeter Lecka/Getty ImagesTodd Gurley did everything he could do to get Georgia a big road victory at South Carolina. Although the Bulldogs lost, he's still a top Heisman candidate.
Call this hyperbole if you want, but it wouldn't shock me if the lightning that delayed Saturday's game and the thunder heard in the distance that day wasn't linked to Gurley's presence in Columbia.

Still, it wasn't enough, but who knows what would have happened if he'd been given the ball on that first-and-goal from South Carolina's 4-yard line with 5:24 left in the fourth quarter. I know Bulldogs fans are wondering how the Dawgs went away from their workhorse back at such a critical moment ...

Through two games, Gurley is second in the SEC with 329 rushing yards on 35 attempts. He's averaging a whopping 9.4 yards per carry and has four rushing touchdowns. He also has a 100-yard kickoff return for a touchdown.

Gurley is your leader in the Heisman clubhouse nationally and the unquestioned one when it comes to SEC candidates. He has that special, rare blend of power, speed and agility that Playstation footballers wish they could compute.

But we already knew all that. So today, I thought we'd talk a little bit about the quarterbacks.

We can't have 10 legitimate Heisman candidates in the SEC. It's just not logical. But we can talk about a handful of guys who could throw themselves into the mix as the season goes on.

  • Kenny Hill, Texas A&M: Obviously, he's the leader out of the quarterback gate. He leads the SEC with 1,094 passing yards and has 11 passing touchdowns with zero interceptions. It doesn't matter who he's played since that phenomenal performance at South Carolina, the kid deserves Heisman love.
  • Dak Prescott, Mississippi State: He's the SEC's best dual-threat quarterback with his 696 passing yards and 273 rushing yards. Prescott has accounted for 11 touchdowns and looks much sharper as a passer in the pocket. The next step is seeing how he performs in SEC play. Oh, hello road trip to LSU.
  • Bo Wallace, Ole Miss: OK, so we never really know which Wallace we'll get in games, but when he's on, he's not too shabby. He's second in the SEC with 1,023 yards and has nine touchdowns to four interceptions (three in the opener). With his 316 yards in a blowout win over Louisiana-Lafayette on Saturday, Wallace tied Eli Manning's mark of 10 300-yard passing games at Ole Miss, which is a school record. Wallace will break that record soon enough.
  • Maty Mauk, Missouri: It's pretty obvious that the Tigers are just fine at quarterback with Mauk. All he's done as the full-time starter is throw for 647 yards and a league-high 12 touchdowns. Mauk can run if he needs to, and has really improved his pocket footwork, but he'd rather just stand and throw down field, which he does really well.

Now, will all of these guys be in the Heisman discussion in November? No. In fact, there's a good chance that by October most of this list will be eliminated from serious contention. But at this early part of the season, it was necessary to mention what these guys had done so far.

Here are a couple of other players to watch when it comes to SEC Heisman chances:

  • Amari Cooper, WR, Alabama: Still the best receiver around. Leads the SEC and the nation with 33 receptions and has a conference-leading 454 yards with two touchdowns.
  • Arkansas RBs: Alex Collins leads the SEC 411 rushing yards and has five touchdowns. Jonathan Williams is third with 322 yards and leads the league with six rushing touchdowns. Honestly, just take your pick with either back because they are both averaging more than 8 yards per carry.
  • Cameron Artis-Payne, RB, Auburn: He was off this weekend, but is still fourth in the SEC with 289 rushing yards and has four touchdowns.
  • Travin Dural, WR, LSU: He was finally kept out of the end zone against Louisiana-Monroe, but is still second in the SEC with 370 receiving yards and has a league-leading four touchdowns.
  • Demarcus Robinson, WR, Florida: Through two games, he has 21 receptions for 339 yards and three touchdowns. If he's not on the field, Florida doesn't beat Kentucky Saturday.

At first glance: SEC Week 4

September, 15, 2014
Sep 15
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What do we know about the SEC right now? Not as much as we thought we did on Friday, before Kentucky put a triple-overtime scare into Florida, South Carolina toppled Georgia and other conference teams gave us reason to doubt previous assumptions about the SEC hierarchy.

The uncertainty is part of what makes following the league fun, though. With a couple more SEC teams jumping into conference play this week, we should soon gain a better understanding of where things actually stand within the conference. But for now -- with a couple of key SEC games and a huge nonconference matchup on Thursday ahead -- let’s celebrate how many SEC fan bases truly believe their teams have a legitimate chance to make it to Atlanta in December.

A quick look at the week ahead:

Game of the week: Florida at Alabama
Little did we know before the season that Florida’s first major challenge of the fall would come from Kentucky and not from Nick Saban’s juggernaut in Tuscaloosa. Will Muschamp’s team (2-0, 1-0 SEC) needed an all-star performance from receiver Demarcus Robinson (15 catches for 216 yards and two touchdowns) and an assist from the back judge who was minding the play clock on a key fourth-down play to beat the Wildcats (2-1, 0-1) in overtime. The Gators need to make a lot of progress in a little time if they’re to have a chance against No. 3 Alabama (3-0), despite the Crimson Tide’s over reliance on dump-off passes to Amari Cooper and occasionally shoddy pass defense. Florida has the ability to make this a competitive game, but it must look a lot more like the team that destroyed Eastern Michigan, 65-0, two weeks ago than the one that easily could have lost to Kentucky.

Player under pressure: Dak Prescott
Mississippi State’s quarterback has been great against three overmatched teams so far (Southern Miss, UAB, South Alabama). When they visit No. 8 LSU this weekend, Prescott and the Bulldogs will gain their first real opportunity to prove they’ll be more than a middle-of-the-pack program in the SEC West this season. LSU hasn’t allowed a single point in nine quarters and has outscored opponents 108-0 since falling behind Wisconsin, 24-7, early in the second half of the opener. The Tigers traditionally win comfortably in this series, so the pressure is on Prescott to keep the Bulldogs afloat against by far the best team they will have faced to date.

Coaches under the microscope: Georgia coordinators Mike Bobo and Jeremy Pruitt
A longtime Mark Richt assistant, Bobo has fielded some of the most productive offenses in school history in recent seasons, but he has taken plenty of heat for not handing the ball to Todd Gurley on Saturday with Georgia knocking at the South Carolina goal line with the chance to take a late lead. That decision blew up in Bobo’s face when the drive sputtered and normally solid kicker Marshall Morgan missed a chip-shot field goal. Meanwhile, newcomer Pruitt’s defense was atrocious, surrendering 447 yards of total offense following a solid debut two weeks ago against Clemson. This Saturday’s matchup against Troy shouldn’t provide a major challenge for the Bulldogs, but it will be their next opportunity to get bad tastes out of their mouths.

Storyline to watch: Auburn’s travel schedule
Playing a Thursday night game halfway across the country can’t help but be disruptive for Gus Malzahn’s No. 5 Auburn Tigers (2-0, 1-0). It might be a competitive challenge, too, as the 1,000-mile trip to Manhattan, Kansas, will culminate with Malzahn’s team facing No. 20 Kansas State (2-0). The sunny side of the unusual trip is that Auburn was off last weekend, so it will not play on short rest. Plus the Tigers will have nine days until they host Louisiana Tech on Sept. 27, so they have extra recovery time built into the back end of this trip and a relatively easy nonconference game between K-State and a huge SEC matchup with LSU on Oct. 4. Nonetheless, this odd piece of scheduling will probably create a couple of headaches for Malzahn and his staff.

Intriguing matchup: Arkansas running game against Northern Illinois defense
Fresh off a 438-yard outing in Saturday’s win at Texas Tech, Arkansas’ impressive rushing attack seems to rank among the nation’s best. Jonathan Williams (22 carries, 145 yards, four TDs against Texas Tech) and Alex Collins (27-212, 2 TDs) might be the best tandem in the SEC and the Razorbacks’ offensive line is doing fine work. Let’s see how they fare on Saturday against a Northern Illinois defense that ranks 13th nationally against the run, surrendering 81 yards per game and 2.4 yards per carry. The Huskies posted those numbers in wins against Presbyterian, Northwestern and UNLV, so they certainly haven’t seen the likes of Arkansas’ running game yet. It seems highly likely NIU’s opponent averages might rise a bit after Saturday’s game.

LSU 'D' dominating as SEC play arrives

September, 15, 2014
Sep 15
10:00
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BATON ROUGE, La. -- Les Miles asked attendees at his postgame news conference Saturday whether anyone in the room was alive the last time LSU posted back-to-back shutouts at Tiger Stadium.

While some of those media members were firmly in middle age, nobody there had been alive since October 1941, a couple of months before the Pearl Harbor invasion pulled the United States into World War II, when the Tigers tied Mississippi State 0-0 and beat Rice 27-0 on consecutive weekends.

[+] EnlargeJalen Mills
Gerald Herbert/AP PhotoCan Jalen Mills and LSU's defense shut out their third straight opponent when the Tigers take on Mississippi State in Week 4?
Junior safety Jalen Mills is one of the veterans on the Tigers' roster, but joked that he "wasn't even thought of" yet by his parents in 1985, the last time LSU notched consecutive shutouts of any sort, when the Tigers won 10-0 against Kentucky at home and beat Ole Miss 14-0 in Jackson, Mississippi. In fact, that piece of history came a full nine years before Mills was born.

Both of those streaks are history thanks to what Mills and the other members of LSU's defense accomplished over the past two Saturdays at Tiger Stadium, first shutting out Sam Houston State 56-0 and then taking down Louisiana-Monroe 31-0.

"They were not getting yards," Miles said after Saturday's win against ULM. "They handed the ball off, they weren't getting yards, and [LSU's defensive backs] were covering. In short throws, they were covering. So I think the defense is playing dominant football."

Both shutouts were impressive. Even when it's an FCS squad such as Sam Houston State or a lower-division team such as ULM, preventing an opponent from scoring a single point is an accomplishment -- and in ULM's case, the Warhawks didn't even generate 100 yards of total offense (they had 93 yards, the fewest by an LSU opponent since 2007).

Now we'll see whether these achievements mean something or whether they'll become historical footnotes that in a few years will interest only those who dig stats out of old media guides.

We'll probably learn which option it's going to be over the next couple of weeks, beginning with Saturday's game against Mississippi State. LSU was supposed to dominate its past two opponents and it did. Neither of those offenses had a player like Dak Prescott at quarterback or weapons like De'Runnya Wilson, Jameon Lewis or Josh Robinson at his disposal.

Prescott (91 rushing yards per game, 232 ypg passing, 12 total touchdowns) is not a legitimate Heisman Trophy contender at this point, but that would change quickly if he runs wild next weekend and the Bulldogs improve to 4-0 in the SEC opener for both teams.

"He's a very mobile guy," Mills said. "He's at best when he is being mobile -- so [LSU's defense must] just try to contain the pocket, try to contain him, try to get the timing on him and his receivers' routes off a little bit."

Prescott and State were giving LSU fits last season until the Tigers got it together late in the third quarter and closed the game on a 31-0 run to earn a 59-26 victory. The defense ignited that win-clinching run by forcing two turnovers and a turnover on downs in State's final three possessions -- mirroring a trend in the Tigers' recent run of defensive success.

They have been finishers. Finishing drives with third-down stops to force punts (ULM had seven three-and-outs in 12 possessions Saturday). Finishing possessions by forcing turnovers (LSU has six takeaways and two turnovers on downs since the start of the fourth quarter in the opener against Wisconsin). Finishing plays with hard hits on quarterbacks and gang tackles on opposing ball carriers.

LSU's defense needs to keep playing that way or its SEC West chances might quickly be finished.

Like some of Les Miles' best Tiger teams, this is not a team built to win shootouts against prolific offenses such as Auburn's or Texas A&M's. Last season's LSU club was more comfortable playing that style of game because of its wealth of NFL-ready skill talent, but this team seems to be cut more from the traditional LSU cloth. Challenge the opponent's manhood with a physical brand of offense. Limit risks and mistakes. Then let John Chavis' defense put away wins by overwhelming opponents with aggression and athleticism.

We're about to discover whether the Tigers have the pieces to duplicate the massive success that previous Miles teams enjoyed while abiding by that basic philosophy.

Will the interior defensive line be good enough to slow down the power running games ahead on the schedule? Will the pass rush be effective enough to force some mistakes? Are the linebackers going to be effective against high-level skill talent? It's too early to respond with a definitive "yes" to any of those questions, but aside from a rocky first half against Wisconsin, things look good for Chavis' bunch so far.

If they stifle Mississippi State's offense on Saturday the way they suffocated two overmatched nonconference opponents the past two weekends, LSU fans will have good reason to ratchet up their excitement level another few notches.

SEC bowl projections: Week 3

September, 14, 2014
Sep 14
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We're creeping closer and closer to the meat of conference season in the SEC. That just means things will get a little clearer in the bowl picture for the league.

We had a major shakeup at the top of our predictions with South Carolina's 38-35 upset win over Georgia, but we're still going with one SEC team making the College Football Playoff and 11 teams from the league making it into the postseason:

College Football Playoff semifinal (Rose Bowl): Alabama
Orange Bowl: Texas A&M
Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl: South Carolina
Capital One Bowl: Auburn
TaxSlayer Bowl: LSU
Outback Bowl: Ole Miss
Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl: Georgia
Belk Bowl: Missouri
AdvoCare V100 Texas Bowl: Mississippi State
AutoZone Liberty Bowl: Florida
Birmingham Bowl: Tennessee

What we learned in the SEC: Week 3

September, 14, 2014
Sep 14
1:35
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Triple overtime in the Swamp? An upset in Columbia that was literally decided by inches? What more could you ask for? And it was only Week 3 in the SEC.

[+] EnlargeMaty Mauk
AP Photo/L.G. PattersonQuarterback Maty Mauk showed his mettle in Missouri's win over Central Florida on Saturday.
1. The SEC East race is wide-open: Had the ball been spotted an inch the other way, Georgia would’ve had good field position and one last chance to tie or win its game against South Carolina. It wasn’t meant to be. With the 38-35 loss, the Bulldogs are no longer the top team in the SEC. They’re not even the top team in their division right now. Technically, that spot belongs to Florida. The Gators are 1-0 in conference play after Saturday’s thrilling win over Kentucky, but they didn’t play like the East’s top team. Maybe it’s Missouri, which rolled over Central Florida at home. The Tigers are 3-0, and Maty Mauk might be the SEC’s best quarterback. Or maybe South Carolina is back after that much-needed win over Georgia. What happens if the Gamecocks run the table? At this point, nobody knows what’s going to happen. That’s why you play the games.

2. Gurley is still a beast and a Heisman front-runner: All week, everybody talked about Todd Gurley and how he’s the favorite to win the Heisman Trophy and how he was going to run all over South Carolina. Well, he delivered. The junior rushed for 131 yards and a touchdown, averaging 6.6 yards per carry in the loss. Those numbers might seem pedestrian for Gurley’s standards, but it was the broken tackles and yards after contact that were so impressive. Although Georgia lost the game, Gurley is the SEC’s top candidate to win the Heisman. The real head-scratcher came in the fourth quarter, when Georgia had the ball on first-and-goal from the South Carolina 4-yard line and tried to pass. Why not give it to Gurley? The star back should pad his stats in a favorable matchup at home against Troy next week.

3. Either Kentucky is much-improved or Florida is in trouble: The game wasn’t even over, and there were people already calling for Will Muschamp’s head. Florida obviously hung on for a 36-30 win, saving Muschamp's job for now. But what does the outcome say about the two teams? For starters, Kentucky is not the same team it was a season ago. The Wildcats came in confident, their defense played lights-out in the first half, and they were a play or two away from snapping their 27-game losing streak to the Gators. Don’t be surprised if Mark Stoops’ bunch ends up in a bowl game this season. With that said, it still didn’t look pretty for Florida. The Gators survived against Kentucky, but what happens when they travel to Alabama next week or when they have to play LSU and Missouri in back-to-back weeks in October?

4. Bielema isn’t going to change, nor does he have to: It was classic ground-and-pound football for Arkansas on Saturday, and Bret Bielema loved it. The Razorbacks flat-out dominated Texas Tech up front while Alex Collins and Jonathan Williams proved why they might be the best running back tandem in the SEC. Collins rushed for 212 yards and two touchdowns, Williams had 145 yards and four touchdowns, and as a team, Arkansas racked up 439 yards on the ground in its 49-28 victory. That’s a lot of yards regardless of the opponent. And no, Texas Tech is not an SEC defense, but Arkansas did the same thing in the first half against Auburn before falling behind by two touchdowns in the third quarter. This is Bielema’s identity. He’s going to run the ball until it works or until he gets fired.

5. Don’t sleep on the two Mississippi schools: Quietly, Ole Miss and Mississippi State keep winning games, and still nobody is talking about them. It was easy pickings Saturday against Louisiana-Lafayette and South Alabama, respectively, but both Magnolia State schools handled their business. Rebels quarterback Bo Wallace threw for 316 yards and four touchdowns in Ole Miss' 56-15 victory, and since the first half against Boise State, he is now 58-of-72 for 857 yards and eight touchdowns. Mississippi State's Dak Prescott threw for 201 yards, rushed for 139 yards and scored twice in Saturday’s 35-3 win. Don’t worry, we’ll find out soon about these two teams. The Bulldogs travel to LSU next weekend, and Ole Miss hosts Alabama in three weeks.

SEC viewer's guide: Week 3

September, 13, 2014
Sep 13
8:00
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UMass at Vanderbilt, FSN
When these teams met last season in Foxborough, Massachusetts, it was a competitive game before a Vandy team that would win nine games locked down a 24-7 victory. UMass gave Colorado a scare before falling 41-38 last weekend, so reeling Vandy had better come to play or it might be on upset alert.

Central Florida at No. 20 Missouri, SEC Network
When last we saw UCF, the Knights were suffering a heartbreaking 26-24 loss to Penn State in their season-opening matchup in Ireland. Mizzou is a 10-point favorite over the Knights, who won the Fiesta Bowl last season before stars Blake Bortles and Storm Johnson jumped to the NFL, but the opener made it clear that UCF can still compete with Power 5 opposition.

3:30 p.m. ET

[+] EnlargeTodd Gurley, Georgia
Dale Zanine/USA TODAY SportsTodd Gurley and No. 6 Georgia are looking for a second consecutive win over No. 24 South Carolina.
No. 6 Georgia at No. 24 South Carolina, CBS
Georgia's visits to South Carolina are almost always must-see TV, although these trips are rarely much fun for Mark Richt's Bulldogs. Even when Georgia has won in Columbia -- and it has lost its past two trips to Williams-Brice Stadium -- the outcome has frequently been in doubt even in the final seconds. Heisman Trophy candidate Todd Gurley should get plenty of work for Georgia in this one.

Arkansas at Texas Tech, ABC
Here's a fun clash of cultures for a national TV audience, which will see Bret Bielema's ground-and-pound face Kliff Kingsbury's passing attack. Texas Tech has a couple of nail-biter nonconference wins on its resume, while Arkansas is coming off a 73-7 drubbing of Nicholls State. The home team is a narrow favorite here, but this could be a good one.

4 p.m. ET

Louisiana-Lafayette at No. 14 Ole Miss, SEC Network
This looked like a sneaky good game before the season, with ULL coming off three consecutive bowl appearances. But the Ragin' Cajuns absorbed a 48-20 beating from Louisiana Tech last week and Ole Miss dominated Vanderbilt in Nashville, so it doesn't look like an upset is in the cards for this one.

Mississippi State at South Alabama, ESPNEWS
This will be the first time an SEC opponent has played at South Alabama and excitement is high in Mobile -- particularly after the Jaguars opened the season with a win and Mississippi State struggled to put away UAB for a while last Saturday. Bulldogs quarterback Dak Prescott and company need to turn in a complete performance with a trip to LSU ahead next week.

6 p.m. ET

Southern Mississippi at No. 3 Alabama, ESPN2
Alabama gets another opportunity to kick around an overmatched nonconference opponent, just as it did last week against Florida Atlantic. The good news for the Crimson Tide, a 48-point favorite, is that most of the starters should be watching from the sideline in the second half, resting up for a visit from Florida next Saturday.

7 p.m. ET

Louisiana-Monroe at No. 10 LSU, ESPNU
Les Miles is a perfect 11-0 against in-state opponents and most of those games have been blowouts, so there is little reason to believe this will be a close contest. That said, the Tigers' secondary should face a reasonable challenge from the Warhawks' no-huddle spread attack.

7:30 p.m. ET

Kentucky at Florida, ESPN
Wildcats running back Jojo Kemp (a native Floridian) poked the bear this week when he made comments about how good it would feel to beat a couple of his former high school teammates -- and current Gators -- and rub it in their faces. Kentucky looks to be a greatly improved team, but it will be a major upset if this game is still close in the fourth quarter, and Kemp's comments probably didn't help the Wildcats' cause.

8 p.m. ET

Tennessee at No. 4 Oklahoma, ABC
As with Kentucky, this is a major measuring-stick game for an improving Tennessee team -- going on the road to face an opponent that virtually nobody expects the Volunteers to challenge. Butch Jones' Vols have been impressive so far, but their inexperience along the line of scrimmage will be their undoing in this one.

9 p.m. ET

Rice at No. 7 Texas A&M, ESPN2
For the second straight Saturday, the Aggies can help SEC viewers get to sleep by drubbing an in-state opponent in a late-night matchup. Rice, a 31-point underdog, might put up more of a fight than Lamar did in losing 73-3 to Texas A&M a week ago, but it won't be much more of one. Kenny Hill and the Aggies win big again.

SEC's top recruiting visits 

September, 12, 2014
Sep 12
10:00
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video
There are much better games on tap this weekend in the SEC than last. Without question the top game this weekend happens on Saturday when the Georgia Bulldogs head to Columbia, South Carolina to take on the Gamecocks. There will be many recruits taking unofficial visits and even a few taking a few official visits. Here is a closer look at some top expected visitors.

Georgia at South Carolina

With 27 verbal commits South Carolina is pretty much full for its 2015 class except for maybe a few remaining spots. One big unofficial visitor this weekend will be Roquan Smith, the No. 2-ranked outside linebacker in the ESPN 300. Georgia is one of his top teams, so he could just be going to see the Bulldogs, but any chance a school gets to have a top recruit on campus, there is always a possibility he could be impressed by what he sees. With their 2015 class almost full, South Carolina will turn to their 2016 class. Three junior prospects, all ranked in the top 50 of the ESPN Junior 300, are expected to be in attendance. The trio consists of quarterback Brandon McIlwain, tight end Isaac Nauta and athlete Mecole Hardman.

SEC morning links

September, 12, 2014
Sep 12
8:00
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Nothing like a little fun in the middle of football season. While Florida athletic director Jeremy Foley was sitting in for head football coach Will Muschamp on a weekly radio spot, Muschamp called into the show under the name "Bill from Gainesville." Muschamp proceeded to talk about how much better Foley was than Muschamp on the air, suggesting he replace Muschamp for the rest of the season on the show and talked about the last-place Boston Red Sox. You can listen to the full audio here.

I missed this earlier this week but couldn't resist posting it. Any time Nick Saban says something you don't necessarily expect to hear, it's interesting. This time, it was Saban using the words "beast mode" in a press conference. This isn't the first time Saban has used "beast" (he used it after motivational speaker Eric Thomas visited Alabama) but this is the first time I can recall he has used "beast mode" in this setting and he was referencing his players and Thomas' words, saying "everybody wants to be a beast."

And in case you missed it, the parents of Texas A&M quarterback Kenny Hill are working on trademarking the nickname "Kenny Trill" which blew up last week after the sophomore quarterback said he liked the nickname. I get the sense that this is as much about protecting Hill and keeping others from profiting off of it (someone else filed for it before Hill's parents did) than it is the Hills trying to profit off of their son's name down the road. Even so, I find it interesting, and maybe even puzzling, that fans, media and others in between feel it necessary that Hill has a nickname. Just because his predecessor, Johnny Manziel, had a cool nickname "Johnny Football," doesn't mean Hill needs one, especially after only two starts. For what it's worth, I like the nickname as a lifelong Houston resident (Houston rapper Bun B, who originally hails from Port Arthur, Texas, popularized the word "Trill," which is a hybrid of "true" and "real"), but if Bun B says Hill has to earn it first, then I'm on team Bun. To Hill's credit, he said he doesn't care too much about the nickname, but his teammates love it.

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