Sources: Gregory out of running at BC

Updated: April 5, 2010, 1:43 PM ET
By Andy Katz | ESPN.com

INDIANAPOLIS -- For the second time in less than a week, an Atlantic 10 coach has decided to stay put rather than pursue the coaching vacancy at Boston College.

Dayton's Brian Gregory talked to BC athletic director Gene DeFilippo, who received permission to talk to him, but has declined to visit Boston for an interview, according to a source close the situation.

Last week, Richmond's Chris Mooney interviewed for the job, which opened when longtime coach Al Skinner and the university agreed to part ways, but decided to stay put in the A-10 and agreed to a seven-year contract.

DeFilippo has also reached out to BC alumnus Bruce Pearl of Tennessee, but he declined to be interviewed as well.

Cornell coach Steve Donahue is now seen as a favorite, given the Big Red's recent success in the Ivy League and trip to this year's Sweet 16. Meanwhile, DeFilippo has interviewed two of Skinner's former assistants, Ed Cooley of Fairfield and Bill Coen of Northeastern.

According to sources, the reason Gregory and Mooney decided against jumping to Boston College and the Atlantic Coast Conference is the comfort level they feel at their respective jobs -- a coup for the A-10. Both jobs are at "basketball-first" programs, where the sport doesn't take a back seat to football for facilities or finances.

Sources said the possible expansion of the NCAA tournament to 96 teams also played a role. Dayton and Richmond are expected to remain top-tier programs in the A-10 and an expanded field would give them greater access to the NCAAs than rebuilding Boston College within the rugged ACC.

Skinner, who led the Eagles to seven of the last 10 NCAAs, parted with BC after the Eagles went 15-16 overall and struggled in the ACC with six conference wins and a first-round exit in the ACC tournament.

Senior writer Andy Katz covers college basketball for ESPN.com.

Andy Katz | email

Senior Writer, ESPN.com

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