Commentary

A snapshot of Patriots' Day memories

Updated: April 18, 2011, 7:30 AM ET
By ESPNBoston.com

If you're from New England or have ever lived near Boston, you know that Patriots Day is a unique New England holiday. It's a day to watch or run the Boston Marathon, take in a rare midday Red Sox game, stroll through Boston among the hordes of marathon visitors and enjoy New England's unofficial start of spring with friends and family.

Six ESPN personalities with ties to Boston -- Gordon Edes, Karl Ravech, Steve Berthiaume, Nomar Garciaparra, Tedy Bruschi and Tim Hasselbeck -- have lived it, and share their memories:

Gordon Edes: The Red Sox writer says he has two special Patriots Day memories, one involving former Red Sox manager Jimy Williams, a California native "who could recite the inscription on the statue of the Minuteman at Concord Bridge." The other memory involves former Sox second baseman Mark Loretta, who in his first game with Boston hit a walkoff home run while his father watched from the stands. Watch Video

Karl Ravech: The Needham, Mass., native has fond memories of watching the marathon from favorite perches in Newton, Wellesley and Brookline, often with a stop for ice cream at Brigham's. "It's always a cool day to watch the runners go by and see the Red Sox play baseball." Watch Video

Steve Berthiaume: The Boston native talks about participating in the Boston Marathon as a high school senior and what a special experience it was. "When you're in that moment, somehow, either as a Red Sox fan, a marathon fan or as a participant, to be part of a very unique and special Boston day is quite something." Watch Video

Nomar Garciappara: The former Red Sox shortstop talks about his memories of Patriots Day from his time with the Red Sox, including having to wake up extra early for that day's game. Watch Video

Tedy Bruschi and Tim Hasselbeck: Bruschi talks about "the super bowl of marathons" and what makes it so special, while Hasselbeck recalls the buzz in the crowd when the leader comes in and the excitement for Dick Hoyt, who pushes his wheelchair-bound son the full 26 miles every year. Watch Video

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