Commentary

Time to end the one-and-done

Updated: June 22, 2009, 12:28 PM ET
By Dick Vitale | ESPN.com

It is time to end the one-and-done, baby!

For college basketball, it makes a fraud out of the term "student-athlete."

Come on, now ... In the one-and-done scenario, it is basically rent a player for a year and then he goes off to the NBA. Bye-bye, and that is not what college basketball should be about. There are no positives in this situation.

It is unfair to an athlete who has to go to school for one year when he has no desire to be in the classroom. College is supposed to be for those who want an education, for those who want to be there.

The player who goes for one season doesn't really want to be there, but is forced to go to school.

It is time to end this mockery. If these kids want to make themselves available for the NBA, then so be it. If the NBA sees fit to draft them, so be it. The league should determine which players legitimately have a chance.

Those players who don't go right to the NBA should have to stay in school for three seasons, a la college baseball. It would bring some stability to the pro basketball game.

I get tired of this broken record. It hurts that people don't listen. It is a fraud and not good for the college game. People who see this situation as a positive are fooling themselves.

Get ready for the next one-and-done superstar, John Wall. Do you think he will stay in school for more than one year? I have received glowing reports about him, and many scouts feel he has the talent and ability to play in the NBA right now.

He will go to college for one year and then it's farewell -- another scenario of a one-and-done who was forced by the system to go someplace he didn't want to.

Is that what we are supposed to be about? Is that the right message?

Dick Vitale

College Basketball analyst
Dick Vitale, college basketball's top analyst and ambassador, joined ESPN during the 1979-80 season. His thorough knowledge of the game is brought forth in an enthusiastic, passionate style. Vitale also contributes columns to ESPN.com.