Commentary

Kansas, UNC advance easily

Updated: April 22, 2011, 12:12 PM ET
By Dick Vitale | ESPN.com

It was blowout city for North Carolina and Kansas on Friday night.

My friends, a lot of teams are capable of winning two games in the Big Dance, but very few can win six games and cut down the nets.

North Carolina and Kansas were high seeds facing teams that played well in the early rounds. Marquette and Richmond fell behind early and both games turned out to be M&Mers -- mismatches, baby!

For the Jayhawks, Brady Morningstar set the tone early, hitting big shots as Kansas pulled away. Richmond's Kevin Anderson could not keep his team close, missing too many shots in the first half. The Spiders finished four-of-26 on three-pointers and you are not going to win or compete when you are missing that much.

North Carolina's frontline dominated once again. Tyler Zeller has been one of the big stars in the tourney so far, and he had 27 points and a career-high 16 rebounds against the Golden Eagles.

Marquette was out of reach in the first half, going into the locker room down 40-15. Give Buzz Williams' team credit for continuing to fight in the second half.

The Tar Heels and Jayhawks are in the Elite 8. Based on the seeding, that is hardly a surprise. The way they won, so convincingly, was impressive. Roy Williams and Bill Self had to be happy with the performances of their teams.

North Carolina has the best frontline in America with Zeller, John Henson and Harrison Barnes. Kendall Marshall knows how to get the ball to the big men. It is not going to be easy to stop that trio; all three will be competing at the next level in the future.

Give a salute to Chris Mooney and Buzz Williams as their teams made it to the Sweet 16. They just could not keep it close on Thursday night.

Dick Vitale

College Basketball analyst
Dick Vitale, college basketball's top analyst and ambassador, joined ESPN during the 1979-80 season. His thorough knowledge of the game is brought forth in an enthusiastic, passionate style. Vitale also contributes columns to ESPN.com.