Elias Says ...

A daily glance inside the numbers from the world of sports.

Updated: October 28, 2006, 2:28 AM ET
By Elias Sports Bureau, Inc. | Special to ESPN Insider

A daily glance inside the numbers from the world of sports:

World Series
• St. Louis is the seventh different team to win the World Series in the last seven years. Although no team has won the Series twice over that span, four players on this year's Cardinals have. David Eckstein and Scott Spiezio were winners with the 2002 Angels, as were Juan Encarnacion and Braden Looper with the 2003 Marlins. The only other players to win two championships over the last seven seasons (2000-06) are Orlando Hernandez (2000 Yankees, 2005 White Sox) and Curt Schilling (2001 Diamondbacks, 2004 Red Sox).

 Braden Looper
Looper
 Juan Encarnacion
Encarnacion

Encarnacion and Looper are the first pair of players to win the World Series as teammates with two different clubs over a span of no more than four seasons since Jesse Orosco and Danny Heep did it with the 1986 Mets and 1988 Dodgers.

Yadier Molina led all players with 19 hits (in 53 at-bats) during the 2006 postseason, batting .358 in the playoffs after compiling a .216 batting average in the regular season. That was the lowest regular-season average in major league history by the postseason hits leader. The previous low was .232 by Jim Delahanty of the Tigers, who led the 1909 World Series with nine hits (26 AB).

Molina was the sixth catcher to lead a postseason in hits. The others were Sandy Alomar (20-for-73 in 1997), Pat Borders (16-for-42 in 1992), Thurman Munson (19-for-40 in 1976), Yogi Berra in consecutive years (10-for-24 in 1955, 9-for-25 in 1956) and Walker Cooper (7-for-22 in 1944).

 Placido Polanco
Polanco

Placido Polanco batted .471 (16-for-34) in the Division Series and League Championship Series, hitting safely in all eight games, but he went hitless in 17 at-bats in the World Series. Polanco was the seventh player to have at least 17 at-bats in one World Series and not record a hit. The others to do that were Dal Maxvill (1968 Cardinals, 0-for-22), Jimmy Sheckard (1906 Cubs, 0-for-21), Billy Sullivan (1906 White Sox, 0-for-21), Red Murray (1911 Giants, 0-for-21), Gil Hodges (1952 Dodgers, 0-for-21) and Lonny Frey (1939 Reds, 0-for-17).

• Detroit's Sean Casey was 9-for-17 (.529) with two home runs in the World Series. Casey was the eighth player to hit .500 or better (in a minimum of 10 at-bats) with at least two home runs in one World Series, but he was the first to do so for the losing team.

YEAR PLAYER, TEAM                      AVG   H  AB  HR  RESULT
1928 Lou Gehrig, NY-A                 .545   6  11   4   4-0
1928 Babe Ruth, NY-A                  .625  10  16   3   4-0
1932 Lou Gehrig, NY-A                 .529   9  17   3   4-0
1953 Billy Martin, NY-A               .500  12  24   2   4-2
1976 Johnny Bench, Cin.               .533   8  15   2   4-0
1990 Chris Sabo, Cin.                 .563   9  16   2   4-0
1993 Paul Molitor, Tor.               .500  12  24   2   4-2
2006 Sean Casey, Det.                 .529   9  17   2   1-4

• The Tigers were not charged with an unearned run in either the Division Series or the League Championship Series, but they allowed eight unearned runs in the World Series and at least one in each of the five games. No other team had ever allowed unearned runs in each of five consecutive World Series games in one year. Before the Tigers, no team had done it in four straight games since the 1932 Yankees.

• Detroit was the first team to commit errors in each of the first five games of a World Series since the 1979 Pirates. Tigers pitchers were charged with an error in each game of the 2006 World Series. No other team has ever had its pitchers commit fielding errors in five consecutive postseason games (or four straight postseason games for that matter). The last team to do that in the regular season was the Milwaukee Brewers in May 1990.

• Tigers pitchers made more errors in five games in the 2006 World Series (five) than Cincinnati Reds pitchers made in 162 games during the 2006 regular season (four).

 Jeff Weaver
Weaver

Jeff Weaver was the fifth pitcher to win the clinching game of a World Series against a former team. Lew Burdette did it in 1957 (Braves vs. Yankees, Game 7), as did Mike Cuellar in 1970 (Orioles vs. Reds, Game 5), Grant Jackson in 1979 (Pirates vs. Orioles, Game 7) and Jose Rijo in 1990 (Reds vs. Athletics, Game 4). All but Jackson did it as a starting pitcher.

• David Eckstein, who played shortstop on the Angels when they won the World Series in 2002, is the third player to start at shortstop for two different championship teams. The others were Dick Groat for the Pirates (1960) and Cardinals (1964), and Everett Scott for the Red Sox (1915, 1916, 1918) and Yankees (1923).

Adam Wainwright tied the record for saves by a rookie in one postseason (four), a mark set last year by the White Sox' Bobby Jenks. Wainwright fanned Brandon Inge for the final out of the World Series. It was the first time that the Series ended with a strikeout since 1988, when Orel Hershiser struck out the A's Tony Phillips to give the Dodgers the title.

 Justin Verlander
Verlander

Justin Verlander was only the third rookie to start a World Series game with his team trailing the series 3-1. Like Verlander, the others suffered losses: Cliff Melton for the Giants in 1937 and Charles Hudson for the Phillies in 1983.

• Prior to this year, no Tigers player had ever homered in consecutive World Series games, but Craig Monroe did that in Games 1 and 2 and Sean Casey joined him with a home run in each of the last two games.

NHL
• The Blue Jackets' Pascal Leclaire recorded the first shutout of his NHL career to lead Columbus to a 2-0 win over the Kings on Friday night in Columbus. Leclaire entered play on Friday having appeared in the most career games (41) among active NHL goaltenders who had never posted a shutout. With Leclaire off the schneid, that leaves only two active goaltenders with at least 10 career games in the NHL and no regular-season shutouts: the Hurricanes' Cam Ward (37 games) and the Coyotes' David LeNeveu (16). Ward does have two shutouts in 23 playoff games.

 Pascal Leclaire
Leclaire

• Leclaire's shutout was the first against Los Angeles this season, but it marked the league-high seventh time that the Kings were held to no more than one goal in a game. Phoenix has scored fewer than two goals in a game six times this season but no other club has done that more than four times.

• Minnesota's Manny Fernandez foiled all three shootout attempts by Anaheim to lead the Wild to a 3-2 win over the Mighty Ducks on Friday. It was Fernandez's sixth straight win in a shootout, dating back to February (final three last season and three this season, allowing only three goals on 21 shootout attempts). Since the NHL instituted the shootout for the 2005-06 season, the only other goaltender to win six or more consecutive shootouts is the Stars' Marty Turco, who won eight in a row from November to March last season.

 Mike Modano
Modano

Mike Modano scored two goals on Friday night to end his personal 10-game goal drought against the Red Wings. Modano, who had no goals and only 13 shots on goal over his previous 10 games against the Wings, ranks third among active NHL players with 27 career goals versus Detroit, behind fellow Americans Jeremy Roenick (29) and Keith Tkachuk (28).

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