Single page view By Patrick Hruby
Page 2

NEW YORK -- Wasteful, infantile, wantonly destructive. All of this is true. Yet to hear Bud Collins tell it, there's an even better reason tennis players are discouraged from smashing their rackets.

"It can be dangerous," the longtime tennis commentator says.

Collins laughs. He speaks from embarrassing experience. Once, while playing in a South African senior tournament, he flubbed an easy shot. Up went his blood pressure. Down went his wooden racket, right into the court.

"I threw it," Collins recalls. "I didn't realize it would have a life of its own. It bounced over the fence. A parking lot was there. A guy was getting out of his car. It hit him."

Mardy Fish
AP
C'mon Mardy ... you know you want to ... do it for the people!

Wait. Hold up. The racket hit a guy in the parking lot?

Sweet.

With apologies to American Express -- which really should be seeking our forgiveness for those annoying Coach K ads -- there's something missing from this year's U.S. Open. And it ain't Andy Roddick's mojo.

Nearly a week into the tournament, we've seen Serena Williams lose a $40,000 earring, defending champion Svetlana Kuznetsova lose in the first round and British hope Andrew Murray lose his lunch on the court. Twice.

Which, admittedly, was pretty cool.

So what's missing? Try a first-class meltdown -- the singular, glorious sight of a ticked-off player rearing back, blowing up and sending his or her oversized boom-stick to graphite Valhalla.

Frankly, tennis fans deserve better.

"I haven't seen one [smashed racket] yet this year," says Carl Munnerlyn, a locker room attendant at the National Tennis Center. "Nothing broken. Nothing mangled."

Munnerlyn knows cracked rackets. In over two decades at the U.S. Open, he has handled more splintered grips and bent frames than he can count, professional athletic instruments violently transformed into masterworks of nonrepresentational modern art.

But the last few years? Not so many.

"You definitely see less of it," he says. "I think players are under more control. They come in knowing they can get beat at any time. Losing doesn't bother them as much anymore."

Don't worry, be happy. Sigh. First hockey goons, now this. To paraphrase Pete Seeger: Where have all the smashers gone?

Once, colossi such as John McEnroe and Ilie Nastase roamed the tennis terra firma, striking fear into the hearts of equipment manufacturers everywhere. Racket abuse became open-air theater. No one was immune.

Back in the 1950s, Collins recalls, former American No. 1 and noted tennis good guy Barry MacKay chucked a racket clear across a lake in Adelaide, Australia.

"Well, it was more like a very broad river," Collins says with a chuckle. "Probably 100 yards. Either way, that was an impressive feat."

Sadly, such feats have become the stuff of tennis legend. Today's players are more likely to emulate Bjorn Borg and Pete Sampras, stoic craftsmen who never found fault in their tools.

Take Roger Federer, the sport's top talent. A tempestuous racket-mauler in his youth, the defending U.S. Open champ now sports a calm, unflappable demeanor. Asked at Wimbledon when he last smashed a racket, Federer couldn't remember.

Continued...


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