The Ultimate Super Rankings   

Updated: January 29, 2007, 7:27 PM ET

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The rankings: No. 80 to No. 61 | No. 60 to No. 41 | No. 40 to No. 21 | No. 20 to No. 1

60. 1973 MINNESOTA VIKINGS     12-2 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
296 21.1 168 12.0 +128 9 of 26 7 of 26 2 of 26 12 of 26 .472 3-2 61-54
Super Bowl: Lost to Miami 24-7     Coach: Bud Grant
Key players: QB Fran Tarkenton (2,113 yards, 15 TD), RB Chuck Foreman (801 yards), WR John Gilliam, OT Ron Yary, DT Alan Page, DE Carl Eller, LB Jeff Siemon, S Paul Krause

Minnesota's defense helped push the Vikings to their second NFC title, but it was ultimately punctured by the Miami running game in the Super Bowl. The Vikings allowed the second-fewest points in the NFL, but ranked toward the middle of the pack in yards allowed. Fran Tarkenton compiled the highest passer rating of his career (93.2), and rookie Chuck Foreman made an impact with 1,163 yards from scrimmage. The Vikings boasted seven Pro Bowl selections and five future Hall of Famers on their roster.

59. 1972 WASHINGTON REDSKINS     11-3 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
336 24.0 218 15.6 +118 7 of 26 11 of 26 3 of 26 4 of 26 .452 6-1 49-20
Super Bowl: Lost to Miami 14-7     Coach: George Allen
Key players: QB Billy Kilmer (1,648 yards, 19 TD), RB Larry Brown (1,216 yards), WR Charley Taylor, TE, Jerry Smith, C Len Hauss, LB Chris Hanburger, DB Pat Fischer

In his second season at the helm in Washington, George Allen coached the "Over the Hill Gang" to the NFC championship. The Redskins enjoyed solid performances from Billy Kilmer and Larry Brown, but their offense ranked just 11th in total yardage. After earning two playoff victories by a combined score of 42-6, Washington was actually a slight favorite over the undefeated Dolphins in Super Bowl VII. However, the Redskins were unable to dent Miami's "no-name defense" and were 2:07 from getting shut out until Mike Bass' fortuitous fumble recovery and touchdown return of Garo Yepremian's infamous flub.

58. 1989 DENVER BRONCOS     11-5 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
362 22.6 226 14.1 +136 9 of 28 15 of 28 1 of 28 3 of 28 .518 7-4 61-99
Super Bowl: Lost to San Francisco 55-10     Coach: Dan Reeves
Key players: QB John Elway (3,051 yards, 18 TD), RB Bobby Humphrey (1,151 yards), WR Vance Johnson (76 rec, 1,095 yards), DT Greg Kragen, LB Karl Mecklenburg, S Steve Atwater, S Dennis Smith

Yes, this team was the victim of the largest blowout in Super Bowl history. Because of that drubbing, many fans forget that the Broncos allowed the fewest points in the league in '89 – safeties Steve Atwater and Dennis Smith were nasty. All five of Denver's regular-season losses were by seven points or fewer, and its only loss to a team with a losing record came after the Broncos had already clinched home-field advantage for the AFC playoffs. John Elway didn't have an exceptional season, but his scrambling ability made him much more valuable than the numbers might imply.

57. 2002 OAKLAND RAIDERS     11-5 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
450 28.1 304 19.0 +146 2 of 32 1 of 32 6 of 32 11 of 32 .529 9-4 92-82
Super Bowl: Lost to Tampa Bay 48-21     Coach: Bill Callahan
Key players: QB Rich Gannon (4,689 yards, 26 TD), RB Charlie Garner (1800 total yards), WR Jerry Rice, WR Tim Brown, OT Lincoln Kennedy, DT Rod Coleman, DT Sam Adams, S Rod Woodson

League MVP Rich Gannon played the best football of his career in leading the No. 2 offense in the league. Jerry Rice, Tim Brown, Charlie Garner and Jerry Porter combined for 315 receptions and 3,770 receiving yards. The Raiders faced a difficult schedule, going 9-4 against teams .500 or better. But they lost four straight at one point, and were woefully unprepared for Tampa Bay in the Super Bowl. The Raiders, 3½-point favorites in the big game, scored two offensive touchdowns – and allowed three defensive touchdowns.

56. 1971 MIAMI DOLPHINS     10-3-1 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
315 22.5 174 12.4 +141 4 of 26 5 of 26 3 of 26 5 of 26 .408 2-1 51-48
Super Bowl: Lost to Dallas 24-3     Coach: Don Shula
Key players: QB Bob Griese (2,089 yards, 19 TD), RB Larry Csonka (1,051 yards), WR Paul Warfield (11 TD), OG Larry Little, DE Bill Stanfill, LB Nick Buoniconti, S Jake Scott

The first of three straight Super Bowl teams, the early '70s Dolphins had a simple strategy: run, run, run and then run some more … and then throw deep to Hall of Famer Paul Warfield. And then stop the other team. Offensively, Bob Griese compiled the highest passer rating of his career, and Larry Csonka had the first of three consecutive 1,000-yard rushing seasons. Miami survived the longest game in NFL history (82 minutes, 40 seconds) against the Chiefs in a divisional playoff, then shut out the Colts to win the AFC championship. However, it was a rough Super Bowl, as Miami's only points came on a field goal heading into halftime.

55. 1967 OAKLAND RAIDERS     13-1 (1-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
468 33.4 233 16.6 +235 1 of 9 3 of 9 2 of 9 1 of 9 n/a 6-1 54-40
Super Bowl: Lost to Green Bay 33-14     Coach: John Rauch
Key players: QB Daryle Lamonica (3,228 yards, 30 TD), RB Hewritt Dixon (559 yards, 59 rec), WR Fred Biletnikoff, TE Billy Cannon, C Jim Otto, DE Ben Davidson, CB Willie Brown

Before John Madden came aboard, the Raiders were already an AFL powerhouse. This team ran (and threw) away from the rest of the AFL, finishing 3½ games better than its closest pursuer and winning the league's title game by 33 points. Daryle Lamonica reached the 3,000-yard mark in passing yards for the first of three consecutive seasons, piloting a vertical game that saw Fred Biletnikoff emerge with his first of six Pro Bowl seasons. But the Raiders did nothing for the credibility of the upstart league by losing convincingly to a Packers team that was in decline and coming off the "Ice Bowl."

54. 1980 PHILADELPHIA EAGLES     12-4 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
384 24.0 222 13.9 +162 6 of 28 8 of 28 1 of 28 2 of 28 .449 4-3 61-50
Super Bowl: Lost to Oakland 27-10     Coach: Dick Vermeil
Key players: QB Ron Jaworski (3,529, 27 TD), RB Wilbert Montgomery (778 yards), WR Harold Carmichael, DT Charlie Johnson, LB Jerry Robinson, CB Herm Edwards

The Eagles were a team that thrived on defense, allowing the fewest points and second-fewest yards in the NFL. They also had solid offensive weapons in Ron Jaworski (top passer rating in the NFC in his best season), Wilbert Montgomery (1,185 yards from scrimmage, 50 receptions) and Harold Carmichael (nine touchdown catches). However, Philadelphia loses style points for dropping three of its last four regular-season games and for going just 4-3 against teams with a record of at least .500. The Eagles had just three Pro Bowlers that season and no players who ultimately reached the Hall of Fame.

53. 1976 MINNESOTA VIKINGS     11-2-1 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
305 21.8 176 12.6 +129 9 of 28 6 of 28 2 of 28 5 of 28 .426 2-2-1 73-65
Super Bowl: Lost to Oakland 32-14     Coach: Bud Grant
Key players: QB Fran Tarkenton (2,961, 17 TD), RB Chuck Foreman (1,155 yards), WR Sammy White, WR Ahmad Rashad, OT Ron Yary, DT Alan Page, LB Matt Blair, CB Bobby Bryant

So we're back to Minnesota. It looked like this might be the team to break the Vikings' Super Bowl jinx. After all, they had one tie and two losses by one and four points. They had two new receivers in explosive rookie Sammy White and vet Ahmad Rashad. Chuck Foreman remained a passing/receiving threat at running back. This team boasted the last of the great Vikings defenses of the '70s, allowing the second-fewest points in the NFL. But there were clues the Super Bowl wouldn't turn out happily: The Vikings were just 2-2-1 against teams .500 or better in playing a weak schedule and the defense was 21st in average yards per rush. Sure enough, Oakland rushed for 266 yards in blowing out the Vikes in the big game.

52. 1991 BUFFALO BILLS     13-3 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
458 28.6 318 19.9 +140 2 of 28 1 of 28 19 of 28 27 of 28 .410 6-2 71-58
Super Bowl: Lost to Washington 37-24     Coach: Marv Levy
Key players: QB Jim Kelly (3,844 yards, 33 TD), RB Thurman Thomas (over 2,000 total yards), WR Andre Reed, WR James Lofton, LB Cornelius Bennett, LB Darryl Talley, LB Shane Conlan

We have the '90 Bills rated higher thanks to a much better defense, but this team was the apex of the no-huddle offensive powerhouse that finished third or higher in points four straight seasons ('89 through '92). This team had over 6,500 total yards (more than a thousand more than the '90 Bills). Amazingly, this Bills defense allowed the second-most yardage in the league. Jim Kelly and Frank Reich combined for 39 TD passes. Andre Reed and James Lofton both went over 1,000 yards receiving. Thurman Thomas was the NFL MVP – alas, he was stopped cold in the Super Bowl, rushing for just 13 yards on 10 carries.

51. 1970 BALTIMORE COLTS     11-2-1 (3-0)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
321 22.9 234 16.7 +87 6 of 26 8 of 26 7 of 26 9 of 26 .370 1-2 60-30
Super Bowl: Beat Dallas 16-13     Coach: Don McCafferty
Key players: QB Johnny Unitas (2,213 yards, 14 TD), QB Earl Morrall, WR Roy Jefferson, TE John Mackey, C Bill Curry, DE Bubba Smith, LB Mike Curtis, LB Ted Hendricks

The least memorable Super Bowl champ of all time, the Colts earned that distinction: They lost four fumbles and threw three interceptions and still won the game. Of course, the Cowboys tossed three picks of their own and committed 10 penalties (seriously, these Super Bowls from the early '70s are unwatchable when you see them pop up on TV). Baltimore's leading rusher gained just 426 yards. Johnny Unitas, the primary quarterback, threw 18 interceptions against 14 touchdowns and completed just 51.7 percent of his passes. Also, the Colts had the second-easiest strength of schedule among postmerger Super Bowl teams, losing two of their three games against .500-plus teams -- by 20 and 17 points. Wait, is it too late to adjust our rankings?

50. 2005 SEATTLE SEAHAWKS     13-3 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
452 28.3 271 16.9 +181 1 of 32 2 of 32 7 of 32 16 of 32 .430 4-2 64-45
Super Bowl: Lost to Pittsburgh 21-10     Coach: Mike Holmgren
Key players: QB Matt Hasselbeck (3,455 yards, 24 TD), RB Shaun Alexander (1,880 yards, 28 TD), WR Darrell Jackson, OT Walter Jones, OG Steve Hutchinson, DT Bryce Fisher, LB Lofa Tatupu

What does it say about Seattle that it became the only team to outgain and commit fewer turnovers than its Super Bowl opponent and still lose? It means the Seahawks either (A) got screwed, or (B) easily could be ranked ahead of the Steelers. Alas, we stick them here, because (A) they did lose just three games, including one in OT and the season finale in which Shaun Alexander and Matt Hasselback sat the second half, but (B) benefited from a very easy schedule, and (C) featured the NFL MVP in Alexander, but (D) still managed to mess up the Super Bowl by dropping several passes and allowing two big plays to Pittsburgh.

49. 1968 NEW YORK JETS     11-3 (2-0)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
419 29.9 280 20.0 +139 2 of 10 3 of 10 4 of 10 1 of 10 n/a 5-1 43-30
Super Bowl: Beat Baltimore 16-7     Coach: Weeb Ewbank
Key players: QB Joe Namath (3,147 yards, 15 TD), RB Matt Snell (747 yards), WR Don Maynard (1,297 yards), WR George Sauer (1,141 yards), OT Winston Hill, DE Verlon Briggs, DE Gerry Philbin

The Jets are undeniably the biggest surprise in Super Bowl history, but they are also one of the least impressive champions. Sure, there's the glitz of Joe Namath and his guarantee of victory over an 18-point favorite. New York also boasted a future Hall of Fame wide receiver in Don Maynard and a solid ground game with Matt Snell and Emerson Boozer. However, the Jets had just the third-best record in the AFL that season. Namath completed fewer than 50 percent of his passes, throwing more interceptions than touchdowns. Coincidentally, Weeb Ewbank coached New York to victory in the Super Bowl over his former team, the Colts. Oh yeah … and the Jets lost the "Heidi" game that season.

48. 1967 GREEN BAY PACKERS     9-4-1 (3-0)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
332 23.7 209 14.9 +123 9 of 16 9 of 16 3 of 16 1 of 16 n/a 5-2 82-38
Super Bowl: Beat Oakland 33-14     Coach: Bud Vince Lombardi
Key players: QB Bart Starr (1,823 yards, 9 TD), RB Donny Anderson, WR Boyd Dowler, OT Forrest Gregg, OG Jerry Kramer, DE Willie Davis, CB Herb Adderly, S Willie Wood

Bring on the hate, old-school Packers fans, but the team that marked the end of the 1960s Packers dynasty also winds up near the bottom of the Super Bowl winners. This team gets docked for ranking just ninth out of 16 NFL teams in points and yards gained. Bart Starr would become Super Bowl MVP but he threw almost twice as many interceptions (17) as touchdowns (9). Further, its leading rusher, Jim Grabowski, averaged just 3.9 yards per carry. That said, the Packers flipped the switch in Vince Lombardi's final postseason, routing the top-seeded Rams, sneaking past Dallas in the Ice Bowl and ultimately toppling the Raiders for the world championship.

47. 2001 NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS     11-5 (3-0)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
371 23.2 272 17.0 +99 6 of 31 19 of 31 6 of 31 24 of 31 .449 2-4 60-47
Super Bowl: Beat St. Louis 20-17     Coach: Bill Belichick
Key players: QB Tom Brady (2,843 yards, 18 TD), RB Antowain Smith (1,157 yards, 13 TD), WR Troy Brown (101 rec), DE Willie McGinest, CB Ty Law, S Lawyer Milloy, K Adam Vinatieri

The Patriots grabbed opportunity by the throat and didn't let go until pundits had crowned them as a dynasty. New England took advantage of Adam Vinatieri's clutch field goals, the tuck rule and postseason touchdowns by its special teams and defense en route to its first Super Bowl victory. But the Patriots had poor rankings in offensive and defensive yardage (outgained overall). Credit Tom Brady and Troy Brown for having terrific seasons, but a legitimate argument can be made that the Patriots were inferior to all three of their postseason opponents. That's why New England was a 14-point underdog to the Rams.

46. 2004 PHILADELPHIA EAGLES     13-3 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
386 24.1 260 16.3 +126 8 of 32 9 of 32 3 of 32 10 of 32 .453 3-2 75-48
Super Bowl: Lost to New England 24-21     Coach: Andy Reid
Key players: QB Donovan McNabb (3,875 yards, 31 TD), RB Brian Westbrook, WR Terrell Owens (1,200 yards, 14 TD), OT Tra Thomas, LB, Jeremiah Trotter, CB Lito Sheppard, S Brian Dawkins

Donovan McNabb had his best season by far (104.7 QB rating) and Brian Westbrook and Terrell Owens, two of 10 Eagles named to the Pro Bowl roster, also had tremendous seasons. Two of the Eagles' losses came while resting their starters after a 13-1 start clinched home-field advantage for the playoffs. Their only other defeat came against the 15-1 Steelers. Their two playoff victories were by 13 and 17 points. However, this team was near the top of the league in just one major statistical category, fewest points allowed, and it played just two teams in the regular season with records above .500.

45. 1969 MINNESOTA VIKINGS     12-2 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
379 27.1 133 9.5 +246 1 of 16 10 of 16 1 of 16 1 of 16 n/a 7-0 57-50
Super Bowl: Lost to Kansas City 23-7     Coach: Bud Grant
Key players: QB Joe Kapp (1,726 yards, 19 TD), RB Dave Osborn, WR Gene Washington, C Mick Tingelhoff, OT Ron Yary, DE Carl Eller, DE Jim Marshall, DT Alan Page, DT Gary Larsen

OK, Vikings fans, one last bit of tortured memory for you. This team was powered by a stingy Purple People Eater defense that ranked No. 1 in the NFL in points and yards allowed (all four members of the D-line made the Pro Bowl). It also went 7-0 against opponents with a record of .500 or better. How good was the D? Minnesota was just 10th out of 16 teams in yards but still led the NFL in scoring (yeah, those league-leading 30 interceptions helped). All pretty stats. But then came Super Bowl IV – five turnovers doomed Minnesota, a 13-point favorite over Kansas City.

44. 1998 ATLANTA FALCONS     14-2 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
442 27.6 289 18.1 +153 4 of 30 7 of 30 4 of 30 8 of 30 .492 4-2 69-79
Super Bowl: Lost to Denver 34-19     Coach: Dan Reeves
Key players: QB Chris Chandler (3,154 yards, 25 TD), RB Jamal Anderson (1,846 yards, 16 TD), WR Terance Mathis, WR Tony Martin, LB Jessie Tuggle, CB Ray Buchanan, S Eugene Robinson

The Falcons rumbled through the NFC West behind workhorse Jamal Anderson's 410 carries, an NFL record until 2006. Chris Chandler posted a career-best passer rating, and Tony Martin and Terance Mathis each topped 60 receptions and 1,100 yards. Atlanta knocked out the highest-scoring team in NFL history in the NFC Championship Game. Its only two losses came against 12-4 teams. Of course, if Minnesota's Gary Anderson hadn't missed a field-goal attempt for the first time that season, it would've been the Vikings in the Super Bowl instead of the Falcons.

43. 1990 BUFFALO BILLS     13-3 (2-1)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
428 26.8 263 16.4 +165 1 of 28 6 of 28 6 of 28 8 of 28 .477 4-3 115-57
Super Bowl: Lost to New York Giants 20-19     Coach: Marv Levy
Key players: QB Jim Kelly (2,829, 23 TD), RB Thurman Thomas (1,297 yards), WR Andre Reed, WR James Lofton, C Kent Hull, DE Bruce Smith, LB Cornelius Bennett, LB Shane Conlan, LB Darryl Talley

This was probably the best team in Bills history -- certainly its best combo of offense and defense. After leading the league in points scored, Buffalo scored 95 points in its first two playoff games, including a 48-point victory over the Raiders in the AFC Championship Game. Jim Kelly posted an NFL- and career-best passer rating, and Thurman Thomas had 1,829 yards from scrimmage and 13 touchdowns. Based on that offensive firepower, Buffalo entered the Super Bowl as a touchdown favorite over the Giants. Despite possessing the ball for less than 20 minutes, the Bills narrowly lost as Scott Norwood's 47-yard field-goal attempt sailed wide right.

42. 1988 SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS     10-6 (3-0)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
369 23.1 294 18.4 +75 7 of 28 2 of 28 8 of 28 3 of 28 .512 6-3 82-28
Super Bowl: Beat Cincinnati 20-16     Coach: Bill Walsh
Key players: QB Joe Montana (2,981 yards, 18 TD), RB Roger Craig (2,036 total yards), RB Tom Rathman, WR Jerry Rice (1,304 yards), OG Guy McIntyre, LB Charles Haley, S Ronnie Lott

The least impressive of the 49ers' championship teams, it had the most losses of any Super Bowl champion, but it proved it belonged with a memorable touchdown drive in the final minutes. Although the Niners lost six games in Bill Walsh's final season, they went 6-3 against .500 or better teams and easily won their first two postseason games (34-9 and 28-3). Joe Montana had an average season by his standards, but San Francisco enjoyed fine seasons by Roger Craig and Jerry Rice, each of whom scored 10 touchdowns. This team proved that even a mediocre season during the 49ers dynasty was pretty darn good.

41. 2005 PITTSBURGH STEELERS     11-5 (4-0)       
Pts Avg Pts
All.
Avg Diff. Rank
Pts
Rank
Yards
Rank
Pts All.
Rank
Yds All.
Opp.
W-L
.500+ Post.
Score
389 24.3 258 16.1 +131 9 of 32 15 of 32 3 of 32 3 of 32 .492 4-4 107-62
Super Bowl: Beat Seattle 21-10     Coach: Bill Cowher
Key players: QB Ben Roethlisberger (2,385, 17 TD), RB Willie Parker (1,202 yards), WR Hines Ward (11 TD), OG Alan Faneca, DT Casey Hampton, LB Joey Porter, LB James Farrior, S Troy Polamalu

The Steelers hit their stride at the right time and won the Super Bowl as a wild card after winning their final four regular-season games to qualify for the playoffs. They also vanquished the seemingly invincible Colts in the divisional round by avenging a regular-season drubbing and edged the NFL's top-scoring team in the Super Bowl. Despite a powerful running game, Pittsburgh was 7-5 through 12 games (although two of those defeats came in OT with Ben Roethlisberger injured). It had just one player, Hines Ward, with more than 35 receptions, and zero skill-position players selected to the Pro Bowl.

STATISTICAL KEY: Pts: points scored; Pts: Points allowed; Avg.: Average; Diff.: Point differential; Rank Pts.: League ranking in points scored; Rank Yards: League ranking in yards gained; Rank Pts. All.: League ranking in points allowed; Rank Yds All.: League ranking in yards allowed; Opp. W-L: Combined winning percentage of opponents (includes games played against featured team); .500 +: Record against teams with record of .500 or better; Post. Score: Cumulative score in postseason games. Note: All statistics are regular season only.

 

Rankings by Kevin Jackson, Thomas Neumann and David Schoenfield. Capsules by Thomas Neumann and David Schoenfield. Statistical sources include "The ESPN Pro Football Encyclopedia," espn.com, pro-football-reference.com, databasefootball.com, superbowl.com, profootballhof.com and Eddie Epstein's "Dominance: The Best Seasons of Pro Football's Greatest Teams."

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