Commentary

James Dempsey wins pot-limit Event 9

Updated: June 7, 2010, 4:31 PM ET
By Andrew Feldman | ESPN.com

For eight hours at the final table of Event 9, $1,500 pot-limit hold 'em, there was cheering, chanting and yelling. Observers said it seemed like more of a soccer match than a poker tournament, and even Mike Matusow was slightly annoyed by the noises made when England's James Dempsey accumulated chips. Dempsey's fans cheers and support would be validated as he would go on to win his first World Series of Poker bracelet.

[+] EnlargeDempsey
WSOPPhotos.comJames Dempsey made his second career WSOP cash one he'll remember.

The online poker pro from Brighton defeated a field of 650 players to become the second English bracelet winner of the 2010 WSOP, following in the footsteps of Praz Bansi in Event 5 just a few days earlier. Fellow countryman J.P Kelly won this event last year, making it the second year in a row this bracelet heads overseas, proving that when it comes to pot-limit events, British players might have a little bit of an edge. Dempsey also believed that people put too much stock into the WSOP bracelet in general.

"It's great to win a tournament, but there's no reason why this should hold any edge of another tournament," said Dempsey. "You play for money. Like someone can come in third in a tournament and make like $300,000, but if you win another event [with a smaller field or lower buy-in] you might get first and its $200,000 -- that to me does not make any sense at all. Poker players play for money. It's great to win a major tournament. But I just think there's too much put onto winning a World Series of Poker gold bracelet. You want to try and win one, of course. You win more money. But you see people playing three events at the same time. It's just stupid."

Dempsey has six tournament wins among his 27 cashes over the past five years. He earned $197,470 for first place after he defeated Steve Chanthabouasy in a two-hour heads-up battle.

Notable finishers from Event 9 include J.J. Liu (third), Melissa Hayden (13th) and Tom McEvoy (41st).

Below are the complete results of Event 9 at the 2010 World Series of Poker:

Event 9: pot-limit hold 'em
Buy-in: $1,500
Entries: 650
Prize pool: $877,500
Players in the money: 63

1. James Dempsey ($197,470)
2. Steve Chanthabouasy ($121,963)
3. J.J. Liu ($86,512)
4. Mark Babekov ($62,232)
5. Scott Haraden ($45,393)
6. Armen Kara ($33,573)
7. Joseph Williams ($25,166)
8. Edward Brogdon ($19,120)
9. Gregg Wilkerson ($14,715)
10. Julie Farkas ($11,468)
11. James Lewis ($11,468)
12. Joe Serock ($11,468)
13. Melissa Hayden ($9,117)
14. Chan Pelton ($9,117)
15. Joe Gotlieb ($9,117)
16. Stephen Simm ($7,248)
17. Kenneth Krouner ($7,248)
18. Jason Alvarez ($7,248)
19. Daniel Burke ($5,870)
20. Christian Harder ($5,870)
21. Steve O'Dwyer ($5,870)
22. Brandon Holmes ($5,870)
23. John Kranyak ($5,870)
24. Clark Hamagami ($5,870)
25. Steve Yea ($5,870)
26. Bryan Pardoe ($5,870)
27. Frank Rusnak ($5,870)
28. Scott Montgomery ($4,808)
29. Luke Tavis ($4,808)
30. Raymond Coburn ($4,808)
31. Aaron Raap ($4,808)
32. Chris Moore ($4,808)
33. Bob Oxenberg ($4,808)
34. James Coca ($4,808)
35. Bob Slezak ($4,808)
36. Iain Paterson ($4,808)
37. Alexander Dovzhenko ($3,992)
38. Michael Fong ($3,992)
39. Justin Young ($3,992)
40. Michael Parizon ($3,992)
41. Tom McEvoy ($3,992)
42. Cornel Andrew Cimpan ($3,992)
43. Joshua Cooper ($3,992)
44. Todd Terry ($3,992)
45. Adam Sherman ($3,992)
46. Jonathan Little ($3,352)
47. Brian Miller ($3,352)
48. John Corr ($3,352)
49. Mark Defaria ($3,352)
50. David Cairns ($3,352)
51. Davis Aalvik ($3,352)
52. Tom Schneider ($3,352)
53. Paul Parker ($3,352)
54. Tim Kahlmeyer ($3,352)
55. Jason Lavallee ($2,851)
56. Jared Jaffee ($2,851)
57. Steven Hustoft ($2,851)
58. Stefan Rapp ($2,851)
59. Dan Sindelar ($2,851)
60. Jason Potter ($2,851)
61. Archibald Vanhorn ($2,851)
62. Michael Maher ($2,851)
63. Eric Lynch ($2,851)

Andrew Feldman is ESPN.com's Poker Editor. He is the host of the Poker Edge Podcast and co-host of ESPN Inside Deal. Andrew has covered the poker industry for ESPN since 2004.

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