Commentary

Harris: Giants lose Jacobs

Updated: September 10, 2007, 12:38 AM ET
By Christopher Harris | ESPN.com

The Giants were devastated by injuries in Sunday night's 10-point loss to Dallas. Eli Manning had to come out of the game with what the team is currently calling a "bruised shoulder," nickel man Kevin Dockery had to be carted off with an ankle injury and defensive end Osi Umenyiora left the game in the first quarter after injuring his leg (X-rays were negative). But worst of all was news that mega-hyped fantasy back Brandon Jacobs had to leave the game after a nasty collision in which Jacobs's knee bent backwards, in ways that human knees were simply not meant to bend.

For the moment, the Giants are calling Jacobs's injury a sprain, but he's set to undergo more tests on Monday, which could potentially reveal more damage. In Jacobs's absence, it was former Jet Derrick Ward -- and not Reuben Droughns -- who picked up the slack, carrying it 13 times for 89 yards (including a 44-yarder) and a nine-yard receiving touchdown. When word came last week that Ward was listed second on the Giants' depth chart, I have to admit I was skeptical; I thought perhaps that simply meant Ward was your third-down back, and that if Jacobs got hurt, Droughns would ascend to the job. That no longer appears to be the case, and as such, Jacobs owners have to go out and sign Ward immediately. He's a solid 5-foot-11, 228-pound back with a bit of speed and ability to punish tacklers. He's not going to be the goal-line force Jacobs might have been (and in fact, it would seem logical that Droughns might spell him on the goal line), but if Jacobs is to miss serious time, Ward will certainly benefit most.

Now as for Manning's injury? That's a whole different ball of wax. Jared Lorenzen is New York's backup quarterback, but I wouldn't be too excited about picking him up just yet. First off, we really don't know if Manning's hurt badly (he kept his shoulderpads on). Second, as a starter, I don't think Lorenzen would be very good at all. Hang tight.

Christopher Harris is a fantasy baseball, football and racing analyst for ESPN.com. You can e-mail him here.

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