Kendrys Morales better conditioned

Updated: March 30, 2011, 1:40 AM ET
By Mark Saxon | ESPNLosAngeles.com

ANAHEIM, Calif. -- Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia said Tuesday he was satisfied with injured slugger Kendrys Morales' conditioning when he arrived at spring training last month.

Morales, who will begin the season on the 15-day disabled list as he continues to recuperate from a May 2010 broken ankle, reported to camp 10 pounds over last season's playing weight, according to his physical, Scioscia said.

"Part of that was not being able to get a lot of the cardio in just because of where the ankle was," Scioscia said. "After he hurt his ankle, you can only do so much upper-body. At some point, you've got to get out there and start doing cardio."

Morales has resumed his workouts this spring, at times using a specially designed treadmill that takes weight off his legs.

"He's trimmed that down," Scioscia said. "He's close to what he needs to be."

Soreness in Morales' foot caused him to miss a week's worth of baseball activities last week, but he has resumed batting practice. He still looks capable of doing some damage with his bat. Morales took five sessions of early batting practice Tuesday, all hitting left-handed, and put on a show. In his final session, four of his seven swings produced home runs, two of them at least 15 rows deep into the right-field stands.

Morales likely will need to get a week or more of at-bats in a minor league rehabilitation assignment before he re-joins the Angels. It's unlikely he'll be back on the field before May.

"He's got to go out there and see some velocity and then you can get a gauge of where he is," Scioscia said.

Mark Saxon covers the Angels for ESPNLosAngeles.com.

Mark Saxon

ESPNLosAngeles.com
Mark Saxon is a staff writer for ESPNLosAngeles.com. He spent six years at the Orange County Register, and began his career at the Oakland Tribune, where he started an 11-year journey covering Major League Baseball. He has also covered colleges, including USC football and UCLA basketball.

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