Player who ran through fence will get bobblehead

Updated: August 12, 2006, 2:18 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

His big-league career spanned 14 at-bats, but he left a lasting impression.

He's Rodney McCray, and when he was with the Vancouver Canadians he ran straight through the outfield fence in Portland, Ore., while chasing a fly ball during a Pacific Coast League game May 27, 1991. It's become a fixture of sports bloopers -- McCray running full speed through the Flav-R-Pac sign in right-center field at Civic Stadium.

Rodney McCray Bobblefence doll
Brook Buxton/Portland BeaversFirst caught on film, then on a bobblehead, Rodney McCray's famous fence-crashing run in 1991 is his legacy.
The moment will be immortalized Saturday when the team hosts "Rodney McCray Bobblefence Night" at PGE Park, as Civic Stadium is now known. McCray will throw out the first pitch, sign autographs and witness the dedication of "McCray Alley" in right-center field.

"I'm honored and tickled to death," McCray was quoted as saying on the Beavers' Web site. "I never get tired of talking about [the crash]. It's kind of like the skier who epitomizes the 'agony of defeat' -- I'm the guy who crashed through the wall. Usually, it's the big-league superstars who get their own bobblehead, so I'm very excited."

In the seventh inning of the Beavers-Canadians game, Chip Hale hit a shot toward the wall. McCray took off.

"I couldn't feel the warning track," McCray said. "Next thing you know, I'm through the wall."

McCray suffered only minor injuries. He stayed in the game but was replaced before his next at-bat in the eighth inning. He's become proud of the moment.

"I might not be a Hall-of-Fame player, but I made it to the Hall of Fame with a film clip," McCray said. "Not too many guys can say they're in the Hall of Fame, some way, some form. It's still pretty cool."