In the crosshairs on Capitol Hill

Updated: March 17, 2005, 11:19 AM ET
ESPN.com

Those who have been called to testify Thursday when the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform holds a hearing on steroid use in Major League Baseball (ESPN and ESPNEWS, 10 a.m. ET):

Current and former players who are coming and why
Name Who they are Why they're testifying What they've said
Jose Canseco
Jose Canseco
Former MLB slugger, now retired Claims to have used steroids throughout his career, in company with other famous players. "We'll be there," said agent Doug Ames. Received subpoena anyway. Had his request for immunity denied, meaning he will not be able to answer questions that would incriminate him, his lawyer said.
Mark McGwire
Mark McGwire
Former single-season home run record holder. Has recently denied accusations from Canseco that he used steroids. Agent said McGwire was "respectfully declining" the invitation. Later, McGwire received a congressional subpoena and he plans to comply, according to a representative of the former player.
Rafael Palmiero
Rafael Palmeiro
Baltimore Orioles first baseman Accused by Canseco of using steroids when the two were teammates in Texas with the Rangers. Told Baltimore media that he doesn't have much to say, and that the hearings conflicted with his wife's birthday. Later received congressional subpoena.
Curt Schilling
Curt Schilling
Boston Red Sox pitcher Spoke out against steroids before baseball implemented testing program. Said he wouldn't testify voluntarily if investigation turns into a "McCarthy witch-hunt all over again." Later received congressional subpoena.
Sammy Sosa
Sammy Sosa
Baltimore Orioles slugger Dogged by steroid allegations and once offered to be first in line for steroid testing. Agent said Sosa was "politely declining" to attend. Later received congressional subpoena.
Frank Thomas
Frank Thomas
Chicago White Sox first baseman Made numerous public statements saying baseball needs cleaning up. Said he was willing to testify, though concerned that the flight to Washington could aggravate an ankle injury. Later received congressional subpoena. Given permission to testify via video connection.

Baseball officials who are coming and why
Name Who they are Why they're testifying What they've said
Sandy Alderson
Sandy Alderson
Former Oakland general manager and executive VP of operations for Major League Baseball Said he'd heard rumors of steroid abuse, but found no proof while in charge of Canseco and other alleged steroid users in Oakland. Received congressional subpoena.
Donald Fehr
Donald Fehr
Executive director and general counsel, Major League Baseball Players Association Union often blamed by Selig for obstructing league efforts at drug testing. Expected to testify voluntarily.
Bud Selig
Bud Selig
Commissioner of Major League Baseball Serves as the sport's ruling governor. Received congressional subpeona. After initially offering a top aide as a substitute, Selig plans to appear, accompanied by Rob Manfred, baseball's executive VP in charge of labor relations.
Kevin Towers
Kevin Towers
GM and executive VP, San Diego Padres Admitted to Buster Olney that he suspected Ken Caminiti was using steroids, but ignored the issue because of box office success. Received congressional subpoena.

Others who are coming and why
Name Who they are Why they're testifying What they've said
Dr. Kirk Brower Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School Addiction treatment specialist; author of studies on steroid dependence. Testifying voluntarily.
Ray and Denise Garibaldi
Ray (left) and Denise (right) Garibaldi
Parents Son Rod committed suicide after steroid abuse. Testifying voluntarily.
Donald Hooton Sr.
Donald Hooton Sr.
Chairman and President of the Taylor Hooton Foundation Son Taylor Hooton, a cousin of former major league pitcher Burt Hooton, hanged himself July 15, 2003 in depression that may have been linked to steroid use. Testifying voluntarily.
Dr. Nora D. Volkow
Dr. Nora D. Volkow
Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health Public health consequences of steroid use. Testifying voluntarily.
Dr. Gary Wadler
Dr. Gary Wadler
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, New York University School of Medicine Representing the World Anti-Doping Agency, which has publicly criticized testing programs in baseball and other professional sports. Testifying voluntarily.

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