2005 Trade Scorecard

Originally Published: July 31, 2005
ESPN.com

Follow along as ESPN.com monitors all the major trade activity leading up to the July 31 deadline.

Click on the dated links below for information on who was traded that day.

JULY 31
Acquired:
OF Matt Lawton
Acquired:
OF Jody Gerut
Acquired:
RHP Kyle Farnsworth
Acquired:
P Roman Colon
P Zach Minor
Acquired:
LHP Ron Villone
Acquired:
P Yorman Bazardo
P Mike Flannery
Acquired:
LHP Buddy Groom
Acquired:
Player to be named and cash
Acquired:
3B Geoff Blum
Acquired:
LHP Ryan Meaux
JULY 30
Acquired:
OF Jose Cruz Jr.
Acquired:
INF Kenny Perez
P Kyle Bono
JULY 31
Acquired:
OF Matt Lawton
Acquired:
OF Jody Gerut
Acquired:
RHP Kyle Farnsworth
Acquired:
P Roman Colon
P Zach Minor
Acquired:
LHP Ron Villone
Acquired:
P Yorman Bazardo
P Mike Flannery
Acquired:
LHP Buddy Groom
Acquired:
Player to be named and cash
Acquired:
3B Geoff Blum
Acquired:
LHP Ryan Meaux
JULY 30
Acquired:
OF Jose Cruz Jr.
Acquired:
INF Kenny Perez
P Kyle Bono

JULY 29
Acquired:
RHP Chan Ho Park
Acquired:
1B Phil Nevin
Jerry Crasnick
Jerry Crasnick on the Padres:

Why they did it: The Padres were tired of Nevin's carping about Petco Park and his declining skills, and they desperately wanted to move him for a fifth starter. After failing in their attempt to send Nevin to Baltimore for Sidney Ponson, the Padres finally found a team that wasn't on Nevin's no-trade list -- and a trade partner desperate enough to take him.

The potential risk: The deal does nothing to remedy San Diego's sluggish, non-productive offense. The Padres are playing David Ross and Robert Fick at catcher while Ramon Hernandez recovers from wrist surgery. And San Diego is getting a pitcher who hasn't been good since 2001. According to the Dallas Morning News, a total of 116 major-league pitchers have made at least 60 starts since 2002. Park's 5.79 ERA is easily the worst in that span -- worse, even, than Jose Lima's.

The potential reward: It's no secret that the Padres felt Nevin was a source of negativity in their clubhouse. They think that team chemistry will improve now that he's gone. And the trade gives Xavier Nady an opportunity to show what he can do at first base without having to look over his shoulder. As for Park, he can only benefit from leaving cozy Ameriquest Field for spacious Petco Park. But the Padres said similar things about Darrell May and Tim Redding, and Petco certainly didn't help them.

Conclusion: This trade, basically a wash financially, is rooted more in a change-of-scenery mindset. Can two high-priced, veteran players who had reached the end of the line with their former clubs find happiness and productivity elsewhere? We shall see.

Jerry Crasnick
Jerry Crasnick on the Rangers:

Why they did it: When the Rangers signed Park to a five-year, $65 million deal in December 2001, owner Tom Hicks proclaimed, "We finally have our No. 1 starter." While the Rangers can never undo that mistake, trading Park makes it slightly less painful to think about all the money they wasted.

The potential risk: If Nevin couldn't be happy in San Diego, so close to home, it remains to be seen how he'll adjust to a part-time role in Texas. Scouts say he's lost a lot of bat speed in recent years, and he hasn't played in the American League since 1998, so he has plenty of adjustments in store. Nevin's arrival also does nothing to address Texas' need for more pitching.

The potential reward: It remains to be seen where Nevin will play given that Mark Teixeira is entrenched at first base and David Dellucci has an over .400 on-base percentage as the Rangers' principal designated hitter. But Nevin, a career .305 hitter against left-handed pitching, brings some potential sock to a lineup that's 7-14 against lefties this season through Friday. If some of those balls that died at the Petco Park warning track clear the fence in Arlington, it could do wonders for his mood.

Conclusion: With Kenny Rogers serving a 20-game suspension, manager Buck Showalter's rotation consists of Chris Young, Ricardo Rodriguez, C.J. Wilson, Joaquin Benoit and undecided in the fifth spot. The Rangers, still in the running for a wild-card spot at 52-50 through Friday, will have to make their run with a very young, no-name staff.

  • More: Complete story | Padres page | Rangers page
  • JULY 28
    Acquired:
    RHP Shawn Chacon
    Acquired:
    RHP Ramon Ramirez
    RHP Eduardo Sierra
    Jerry Crasnick
    Jerry Crasnick on the Yankees:

    Why they did it: For starters, they needed someone to pitch Saturday against the Angels. That's what the injuries to Carl Pavano, Chien-Ming Wang, Jaret Wright and Kevin Brown have produced in New York -- a state of roster management by desperation.

    The potential risk: Chacon failed as Colorado's closer last season -- posting a 7.11 ERA and blowing nine saves in 44 opportunities -- and it remains to be seen if he has the makeup to handle pitching in a pennant race in New York. Chacon has been on the disabled list twice this season with hamstring problems, and over five big-league seasons, he has a horrendous strikeout-to-walk ratio of 385-to-293. The Yankees already have one chronic nibbler in Al Leiter. If Chacon can't harness his control, he's another guy who'll put his defense to sleep and make manager Joe Torre squirm in the dugout.

    The potential reward: Chacon is only 27, and he should benefit from getting out of Coors Field and pitching in the more charitable environs of Yankee Stadium. In his last two starts, Chacon gave Colorado seven effective innings against Washington and Pittsburgh, so he's on a bit of a roll. His 1-7 record with the Rockies this year was also deceptive, given that the team scored a total of 11 runs in his seven losses.

    Conclusion: It's astounding that a team with a $208 million payroll has to resort to such unappealing options in July to plug holes in its rotation. The Yankees are fortunate that they've gotten something out of journeyman Aaron Small. If Chacon fails to cut it, there's always Hideo Nomo warming up in Columbus. The Yankees hope it doesn't come to that.

    Jerry Crasnick
    Jerry Crasnick on the Rockies:

    Why they did it: The Rockies plan to run out a top four of Jeff Francis, Jason Jennings, Aaron Cook and Zach Day in 2005. Chacon could make $3 million next season in salary arbitration, and that's a little pricey for a No. 5 starter on a losing ballclub.

    The potential risk: Chacon is a local kid from the northern Colorado city of Greeley, so the Rockies could encounter a bit of a backlash by sending him packing. Then again, with Broncos training camp under way, is anyone in Denver paying attention to baseball?

    The potential reward: The Rockies, who had expressed interest in Triple-A starter Sean Henn, settled for two 23-year-old prospects who are projected as middle relievers in the big leagues. Sierra is a hard-throwing Dominican in the Jesus Colome-Franklyn German mold. He has a fastball in the mid-90s, but has had difficulty throwing strikes in the minors. Ramirez, undersized for a righty at 5-foot-11, has a reputation for falling in love with his curveball. Both pitchers will report to Colorado's Double-A club in Tulsa.

    Conclusion: Rockies GM Dan O'Dowd has quietly been busy, dealing Preston Wilson to Washington, trading Joe Kennedy to Oakland for Eric Byrnes, and now moving Chacon for two young arms. The Rockies, so bad they can't even contend in the feeble National League West, continue to look to the future. That's not a bad idea when you're nearly 20 games under .500.

  • More: Complete story | Yankees page | Rockies page
  • JULY 23
    Acquired:
    3B Joe Randa
    Acquired:
    RHP Justin Germano
    RHP Travis Chick
    Jerry Crasnick
    Jerry Crasnick on the Padres:

    Why they did it: The Padres, who seemed so confident and self-assured after their 22-6 May, have given the Dodgers, Diamondbacks and Giants new life with their uninspired play. Manager Bruce Bochy's team is 17-29 since May 31 and working on a six-game losing streak, so changes were inevitable.

    The potential risk: It might take more than Randa to turn around a stalled San Diego offense. While Randa's .847 combined on-base plus slugging percentage ranks him fourth among NL third basemen behind Aramis Ramirez, David Wright and Morgan Ensberg, he's leaving homer-friendly Great American Ball Park for pitcher-friendly Petco. His power numbers are likely to suffer as a result.

    The potential reward: Randa is a positive personality and reliable teammate who won't have any trouble blending in in San Diego. He gives the Padres a reliable glove and more offense at third base than Sean Burroughs, who had one homer and a feeble .302 slugging percentage in 255 at-bats this season. Randa's arrival also sends a signal to the San Diego players that GM Kevin Towers is trying to do something -- despite budget limitations and a lack of tradeable prospects on the farm -- to extricate the team from its funk.

    Conclusion: Randa has arrived and Burroughs is on his way to Triple-A Portland. Now Towers is working on a Phil Nevin-for-Sidney Ponson trade, which is basically a case of swapping his unproductive, overpaid player for somebody else's.

    Jerry Crasnick
    Jerry Crasnick on the Reds:

    Why they did it: The Reds aren't going anywhere in the National League Central, so it made sense for general manager Dan O'Brien to move Randa, who's 35 and eligible for free agency this winter.

    The potential risk: Cincinnati desperately needs an infusion of young pitching, and Baseball America ranked Chick as San Diego's No. 4 prospect and Germano No. 7. But that's more a commentary on the lack of talent in a weak San Diego farm system than an endorsement of their potential. Chick, 21, was 2-9 with a 5.27 ERA for Double-A Mobile this season. Germano, a control specialist, projects as more a No. 5 starter type than a front-of-the-rotation guy.

    The potential reward: Randa's departure clears the way for the Reds to take a look at hot prospect Edwin Encarnacion, who was recalled from Triple-A Louisville and will take over at third base in Cincinnati.

    Conclusion: Now that Randa is gone, the rumors will continue to swirl around Adam Dunn, Ken Griffey Jr. & Co. That's a hazard of playing for a team that began the season with high expectations and finds itself 20 games out in late July. When Randa homered off Braden Looper to beat the Mets 7-6 on Opening Day, he never could have envisioned this.

  • More: Complete story | Padres page | Reds page
  • JULY 18
    Acquired:
    OF Jody Gerut
    Acquired:
    OF Jason Dubois
    Jerry Crasnick
    Jerry Crasnick on the Cubs:

    Why they did it: The Cubs, desperate for outfield help, were even more ardent in their pursuit of Cincinnati's Austin Kearns than Cleveland was. Chicago management had basically given up on Dubois. The Cubs are hoping that Gerut, who grew up in the Chicago suburb of Elmhurst, Ill., can rebound with a change of scenery.

    The potential risk: Gerut hit 22 homers and drove in 75 runs in 2003 to become the first Cleveland rookie to lead the team in both departments since Joe Charboneau in 1980. But his power numbers dipped considerably before he blew out his knee last September, and he continued to have trouble driving the ball this year. Gerut, 27, developed a reputation as strong-willed and slow to adjust in Cleveland. He'll try to amend that with the Cubs.

    The potential reward: Gerut is a much better defensive player than Dubois, and is capable of playing all three outfield positions. It remains unclear if Dusty Baker will give Gerut extensive playing time in left field or stick with the platoon of Todd Hollandsworth and rookie Matt Murton. Either way, Gerut gives the Cubs a little more experience than Dubois. That's always a plus where Baker is concerned.

    Conclusion: Cubs GM Jim Hendry reportedly hasn't given up on his pursuit of Kearns. But if a deal with Cincinnati fails to materialize, he has an outfielder who could be useful in the team's quest for a wild-card spot.

    Jerry Crasnick
    Jerry Crasnick on the Indians:

    Why they did it: Cleveland's .242 team average vs. left-handed pitching is the worst in the American League. The Indians were desperate for a righty bat to protect Travis Hafner in the middle of the order, and they made failed runs at Kearns and the Giants' Moises Alou, among others, before acquiring Dubois.

    The potential risk: Dubois is a below-average defender, and with Hafner a fixture at DH, he'll be asked to play some right field in Cleveland. It remains to be seen how he'll handle the demands of the position. His arrival could also force manager Eric Wedge to do some lineup juggling. Casey Blake, who has started 71 games in right field, might lose some at-bats, or he could shift to third base and take at-bats from Aaron Boone. Blake is hitting .224 and Boone .214, so neither player can squawk about reduced playing time.

    The potential reward: Dubois hit 31 homers in 109 games for the Cubs' Triple-A Iowa farm club last season, so he has some serious thump. With Hafner slow to come back after getting hit in the head by a Mark Buehrle pitch over the weekend, Dubois gives Cleveland some short-term insurance at the DH position.

    Conclusion: This isn't as splashy an acquisition as Cleveland GM Mark Shapiro might have preferred. But if Dubois is able to relax in Cleveland -- something he was never able to do under Dusty Baker in Chicago -- he could add a new dimension to the Indians' lineup in the team's bid for a wild-card spot.

  • More: Complete story | Cubs page | Indians page