Media will need waiver to interview Bonds one-on-one

Updated: February 25, 2006, 4:07 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- Media members must sign a release waiver to conduct one-on-one interviews with Barry Bonds but not for interviews in normal group settings, the producer of his reality TV show told the San Francisco Giants.

Barry Bonds
Bonds

Bonds told reporters Friday that he wouldn't conduct interviews with media members until they sign the release allowing footage of them to be shown on his upcoming show on ESPN.

Producer Mike Tollin told the team that would apply only to one-on-one interviews, team spokesman Jim Moorehead said Saturday.

After taking batting practice for a fourth straight day Saturday, Bonds declined to comment on his status but said it had nothing to do with reporters not signing the waivers. He said he had nothing new to report and indicated he would talk at some undetermined later date.

ESPN Original Entertainment, an entity separate from ESPN's news operation, is working with Bonds for a behind-the-scenes look at his quest for baseball's all-time home-run record. ESPN said Friday its reporters would not sign the waiver.

Bonds has 708 career home runs, seven shy of passing Babe Ruth for second place and 48 away from breaking Hank Aaron's record.

Bonds played only 14 games last season after three operations on his right knee. Bonds has taken batting practice every day since joining the team this spring, but still has not done full running or agility workouts with his teammates.

The Giants would like to be able to use Bonds as a designated hitter this spring, even in home games played under National League rules. To do that, they will need permission from the opposition, and manager Felipe Alou said it's important for Bonds to play left field this spring.

"It is good to do that, but sooner or later Barry is going to play in the field," Alou said. "Because on Opening Day, what will we do? ... It's not like it's going to be every game he's DH. For us as a team, it can't be that way."

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

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