Dodgers to open all-you-can-eat section

Updated: January 11, 2007, 8:01 PM ET
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -- Right field at Dodger Stadium used to feature cheap seats. This year, there will be lots of food and seats that are no longer cheap.

The Los Angeles Dodgers are converting their right-field pavilion into all-you-can-eat bleachers. Takers will have access to as many hot dogs, peanuts, popcorn, nachos and soft drinks as they want.

"Instead of paying cash, fans ask for whatever they want, and they get it. There are going to be some self-service parts, buffet-style, as well," said Dodgers executive vice president and chief operating officer Marty Greenspun.

Around 3,000 seats right-field seats will be sold for $35 in advance and $40 on game day with the all-you-can-eat special.

Left-field tickets, meanwhile, will sell for $10.

The stadium's cheapest seats, in the top deck, will go for $10 next season instead of $6.

Greenspun said the Dodgers tested the all-you-can-eat concept three times late last season.

"The response was overwhelmingly positive," he said.

A few other teams have had all-you-can-eat sections.

"The St. Louis Cardinals have done it," Greenspun said. "It hasn't been anything of this size."

In addition, he said, "the other ballparks charge a higher rate than this."

There are limitations. The food booths open 90 minutes before games and close two hours after it begins. And if someone asks for 100 Dodger Dogs, that won't fly.

"If a person goes up there and asks for four for his family, he won't be told no," said Camille Johnston, the Dodgers senior vice president of communications.

All-you-can-eat isn't exactly the most health-conscious concept these days, but as Greenspun put it: "We're offering a fan amenity. Fans can elect to choose it or not choose it. We are offering basic ballpark fare that most fans enjoy."

Besides, the most fattening foods -- beer, ice cream and candy -- aren't part of the package. They will be sold at regular ballpark prices.


Copyright 2007 by The Associated Press