Reds' Freel 'slowly improving' from latest concussion

Updated: June 9, 2007, 2:46 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

Ryan Freel

Freel

The Cincinnati Reds said Friday that injured utility man Ryan Freel is "slowly improving" from a concussion sustained in an outfield collision but hasn't been cleared for physical activity, the Cincinnati Enquirer reported.

Freel, who spoke Friday with the media for the first time since his injury, continues to experience lingering effects from the May 28 collision with Reds outfielder Norris Hopper, and admitted to feeling uncertain about his ability to come back, according to the Enquirer.

"For the first five days, I didn't get out of bed," Freel said of the post-concussion symptoms, according to the newspaper. "I had some pretty bad headaches, and nausea and dizziness. ... But [the headaches] has gotten better, so maybe [the injury] is getting better."

According to the report, Freel said he does not remember running or reaching for the ball before the collision -- only looking up and seeing teammates as he lay on the field.

"And I remember wondering, 'What is going on?' ... That's when it occurred to me I'd probably just had another concussion," he said, according to the newspaper.

Freel met with team medical director Dr. Tim Kremchek on Friday and has also met with spine specialist Dr. John Brannan, who prescribed rest and limited activity, according to the report.

"[But] I am a little nervous," Freel said. "I just want to know more about what's going on. ... I don't feel real comfortable as far as where I stand in terms of getting back [into the lineup]."

Freel also told reporters that he's had a history of concussions, and estimated there have been "six or seven" that he knows of, and a few others that he doesn't remember.

"It's probably nine or 10 I've had," he said. "But nothing like this. I'd bounce back in a few days, miss four or five days, but never had the lingering effects like this. I had some dizziness and some headaches, but not like I'm having now. This is totally different."