Yanks will not reveal MRI results until Joba is seen by Andrews

Updated: August 6, 2008, 1:27 PM ET
Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas -- New York Yankees pitcher Joba Chamberlain will be examined by noted orthopedic surgeon Dr. James Andrews on Wednesday after undergoing an MRI on his ailing right shoulder.

Chamberlain returned to New York for tests on his shoulder Tuesday. The team said before its game against the Texas Rangers that it would not reveal the results of the MRI exam until Chamberlain is seen by Andrews in Birmingham, Ala.

"He'll take his test results with him," Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. "Until I hear from Dr. Andrews, that's all I've got."

Chamberlain was removed from Monday night's start against Texas in the fifth inning with what the club announced was a stiff right shoulder.

Joba Chamberlain

Chamberlain

On Tuesday, Chamberlain flew back to New York and underwent a series of tests, including an MRI, at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan.

The Yankees are already without No. 1 starter Chien-Ming Wang and right-hander Phil Hughes. Subtracting Chamberlain from the rotation would be a huge blow to the team's postseason chances.

"I think we're all hopeful," Girardi said. "I hope we don't miss him for very long. But you think of a guy of Joba's caliber and you know he's going to miss a start, that doesn't mean the guy who replaces him can't pitch well."

Girardi said the 22-year-old right-hander would probably miss his next turn in the rotation, which is scheduled for Saturday. Anything longer would be a setback for the injury-riddled Yankees pitching staff.

"I envision him not making his next start," Girardi said. "Beyond that, I can't say."

Girardi said his options for replacing Chamberlain include moving right-hander Darrell Rasner back into the rotation or recalling a pitcher from Triple-A Scranton.

Girardi said the Yankees will be cautious with Chamberlain, even in a close playoff race.

"You're always careful with your players," Girardi said. "You don't want to jeopardize their long-term health. And we're talking about a 22-year-old kid here."


Copyright 2008 by The Associated Press

ALSO SEE