Notable players linked to PEDs

Updated: July 30, 2009, 4:26 PM ET
ESPN.com

ESPN's Stats & Information group looks at some of the key Major League Baseball players who have been implicated or have admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs. Their names are in alphabetical order.

Barry Bonds: Implicated
Bonds, baseball's all-time home run king, said during testimony to the federal grand jury looking into the Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative (BALCO) that he took substances described to him by trainer Greg Anderson as linseed oil and rubbing balm, which the BALCO investigators say were PEDs. Bonds said he did not knowingly take those substances. His testimony was leaked to the San Francisco Chronicle in a Dec. 3, 2004, article.

Bret Boone: Implicated
The former All-Star second baseman was named by Jose Canseco in Canseco's autobiography, "Juiced, Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits, and How Baseball Got Big."

Kevin Brown: Named in Mitchell report
Former pitcher is reported to have purchased human growth hormone from Kirk Radomski, a former New York Mets employee who pleaded guilty in 2007 to distributing performance-enhancing drugs to dozens of major league players between 1995 and 2005.

Ken Caminiti: Admitted
The late Caminiti, who hit 239 career home runs in a 15-year career with five teams, admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs in an interview with Sports Illustrated's Tom Verducci in 2002. He died in 2004 of an apparent heart attack.

Jose Canseco: Admitted
Canseco, a six-time All-Star who hit 462 career home runs, admitted to using PEDs in his autobiography, "Juiced, Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits, and How Baseball Got Big," which was released in February 2005.

Roger Clemens: Named in Mitchell report
The seven-time Cy Young Award winner was named in the Mitchell report by Brian McNamee, who said he injected Clemens with anabolic steroids and HGH during a three-year period beginning in 1998.

Lenny Dykstra: Implicated
A three-time All-Star who won a World Series title in 1986 with the New York Mets, Dykstra was named in a 2005 civil suit brought by a former business partner; the suit contains sworn testimony from Jeff Scott, a bodybuilder and convicted steroid dealer, who said he injected Dykstra with steroids.

Chuck Finley: Implicated
His former wife, Tawny Kitaen, said in an official declaration during their 2002 divorce proceedings that Finley -- who won 200 big league games -- used steroids during their marriage and that she witnessed Finley injecting the steroids.

Eric Gagne: Named in Mitchell report
The former reliever was named in the Mitchell report for buying HGH from Radomski.

Jason Giambi: Admitted
Giambi, currently a member of the Oakland A's, admitted using PEDs during testimony to a BALCO grand jury. That testimony was leaked to the San Francisco Chronicle in December 2004. Giambi later issued a public apology in a USA Today article on May 17, 2007.

Troy Glaus: Implicated
A 2007 SI.com story reported that Glaus, the Most Valuable Player in the 2002 World Series with the Anaheim Angels, ordered and received anabolic steroids from the Internet pharmacy Signature Pharmacy through the New Hope Health Center.

Juan Gonzalez: Implicated
The six-time Silver Slugger winner was named in a New York Daily News article on July 30, 2006, that linked Gonzalez to a bag with steroids found at the Toronto airport in 2001. He also was named in Canseco's book.

Wally Joyner: Admitted
Joyner, who spent most of his career with the Angels, admitted to using PEDs in a 2005 ESPN.com E-Ticket story written by Buster Olney.

David Justice: Named in Mitchell report
Justice, who was a three-time All-Star and 1990 rookie of the year, was named as buying HGH from Radomski. He denies it.

Chuck Knoblauch: Named in Mitchell report
Knoblauch was named in the Mitchell report for buying HGH from Radomski by making payments through Brian McNamee, who later confirmed that he acquired HGH for Knoblauch and personally injected him.

Mark McGwire: Implicated
The former owner of baseball's single-season home run record was named in a March 13, 2005, report by the New York Daily News that linked him to an FBI steroids investigation in 1992 called Operation Equine. According to the report, Curtis Wenzlaff, a steroids dealer, provided McGwire with illegal steroids.

Magglio Ordonez: Implicated
Ordonez, currently a member of the Detroit Tigers, was named in a New York Times article on Jan. 24, 2008. The story reported sources who said Canseco offered to keep Ordonez's name out of his second book if he would invest in a movie project with him.

David Ortiz: Reportedly positive
The New York Times reported Thursday that according to lawyers with knowledge of the results, Ortiz tested positive in 2003. The information about Ortiz (along with Manny Ramirez) emerged through interviews with multiple lawyers and others connected to the pending litigation, the newspaper said.

Rafael Palmeiro: Positive
The four-time All-Star and member of the 3,000-hit club tested positive for steroids on Aug. 1, 2005, and was suspended 10 games for violation of Major League Baseball's Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program.

Andy Pettitte: Admitted
Two days after being cited in the Mitchell report, Pettitte admitted he had used HGH.

Manny Ramirez: Suspended
Ramirez, while playing with the Los Angeles Dodgers, was suspended 50 games for violation of MLB's Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. According to a story in The New York Times on Thursday, he also reportedly tested positive for PEDs in 2003.

Brian Roberts: Admitted
After being named in the Mitchell report, the Baltimore Orioles infielder admitted to using steroids "once," according to a Dec. 18, 2007, article in the Baltimore Sun.

Alex Rodriguez: Admitted
Rodriguez, who has more than 500 career home runs, admitted to using PEDs in an interview with ESPN's Peter Gammons on Feb. 9. Days earlier, SI.com reported that Rodriguez had tested positive for two anabolic steroids, testosterone and Primobolan, during his 2003 season while playing for the Texas Rangers. In a 2007 interview with Katie Couric, Rodriguez denied ever having used PEDs.

Ivan Rodriguez: Implicated
In Canseco's book, Canseco accused the World Series-winning catcher of being injected with steroids.

Benito Santiago: Admitted
According to leaked testimony cited by the San Francisco Chronicle on Dec. 3, 2004, the former big league catcher admitted to using PEDs during testimony to a BALCO federal grand jury.

Gary Sheffield: Admitted
According to leaked testimony cited by the San Francisco Chronicle on Dec. 3, 2004, the outfielder with 500-plus career homers admitted to using PEDs during testimony to a BALCO federal grand jury.

Sammy Sosa: Implicated
Sosa, according to a June 16 story in The New York Times, was named by lawyers with knowledge of the 2003 drug-testing results as one of the players who tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs in 2003.

Miguel Tejada: Mitchell report
Tejada, who was an All-Star as recently as the 2009 season, was named in the Mitchell report by A's outfielder Adam Piatt, who says he discussed steroid use with Tejada and provided him with testosterone and HGH.

Mo Vaughn: Mitchell report
The former Red Sox and Mets first baseman was named in the Mitchell report for buying HGH from Radomski.

Matt Williams: Implicated
In a report in the San Francisco Chronicle, Williams was named for buying performance-enhancing drugs from the Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center in 2002.