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Silva pitches first complete-game shutout

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- Carlos Silva was so enthused about his first
career complete game and shutout that he chucked what would've been
a nice souvenir into the stands.

Backed by sound defense and a burst of power, Silva and the
Minnesota Twins beat the Anaheim Angels 10-0 Tuesday night. After
covering first base to record the final out on a 3-6-1 double play,
the always-emotional Silva whirled and heaved the ball well into
the upper deck above third base.

It was a move that slightly tarnished his feat and steamed
manager Ron Gardenhire, who said he would apologize to colleague
Mike Scioscia.

"Very unprofessional -- that's not the way we do things here,"
Gardenhire said. "He knew that was wrong. That's embarrassing to
the other team."

The Twins hit four home runs and tied a team record by turning
six double plays, winning for the 12th time in 14 games and handing
the Angels just their second loss in seven games.

Torii Hunter homered to left, Jacque Jones singled and Corey
Koskie homered to right on consecutive pitches in the fourth.
Justin Morneau added a two-run homer in the seventh, and Henry
Blanco hit a solo shot in the eighth.

Neither Scioscia nor Anaheim players mentioned anything after
the game about Silva's display. They were just frustrated by the
missed chances.

"It's uncharacteristic of our offense," Scioscia said. "We're
usually very aggressive and can avoid the double plays for the most
part. Tonight, it didn't matter where we were hitting them."

Silva (10-7), making his 22nd career start, gave up 11 hits,
struck out three and walked two. After entering the clubhouse, he
immediately approached pitching coach Rick Anderson and admitted
his mistake.

"I don't know why I threw the ball," Silva said. "I think a
lot of people don't like that. If they don't like it, I
apologize."

Blanco and Shannon Stewart each had two RBI in a four-run sixth
against John Lackey (9-10), who allowed seven runs and seven hits
in 5 2-3 innings. He walked three, hit two batters and struck out
six.

After winning his first five decisions this season, Silva has
been up and down. A groundball pitcher who relies on his sinker,
and not strikeouts, Silva is prone to giving up lots of hits -- he
put nine runners on in the first five innings.

But he's also shown an ability to escape trouble and pitch deep
into games. Some of that comes from his aggressive nature, the same
trait that caused the outburst.

"That's part of learning," Anderson said.

The Angels could easily have built an early lead, but the Twins
bailed out Silva by turning nifty double plays in each of the first
four innings.

Vladimir Guerrero grounded into a 6-4-3 double play to end the
first with runners on first and second. Robb Quinlan's line drive
with two on and nobody out in the second was caught by Luis Rivas
at second base, who flipped to shortstop Cristian Guzman to double
up Jose Guillen.

Morneau snagged a liner by Chone Figgins to first with one on
and one out in the third, stepping on first to retire Jose Molina.
And with two on and one out in the fourth, Darin Erstad bounced
into a 4-6-3 double play.

"He kept the ball down and didn't keep it in the zone too
much," Figgins said. "When you do that and get hitters to chase,
you get outs."

After a 1-2-3 fifth, Lackey lost control in the sixth --
sandwiching a walk between two hit batters that loaded the bases.
Blanco blooped a single into shallow left-center field to drive in
two and make it 5-0.

Rivas walked one out later, and Stewart sent a double down the
right-field line to score two more and send Lackey to the
clubhouse.

Lackey was 5-2 over his last 10 starts and was coming off an
eight-inning, three-hit, no-run outing at home against Texas last
week. He's struggled mightily on the road, though, this year -- he
has a 6.36 ERA in 69 1-3 innings.

"I'm only disappointed by about three pitches all night,"
Lackey said. "The two homers, and the last pitch to Stewart I left
up. Other than that, I thought I threw the ball pretty decent."

Game notes
Quinlan, the AL's rookie of the month for July, extended
his hitting streak to 14 games. That's the longest by an Anaheim
rookie since Bengie Molina hit in 14 straight in 2000. ...
Minnesota SS Jason Bartlett, who made his major league debut in the
eighth, had a throwing error and struck out. ... The Twins' six
double plays tied a team record, set first at Boston on July 18,
1990.