Blazers get No. 6, No. 27 and '06 first-rounder

Updated: June 28, 2005, 8:50 PM ET
Associated Press

PORTLAND, Ore. -- The Portland Trail Blazers chose Seattle high school star Martell Webster with the sixth overall pick in the NBA draft Tuesday night, after trading the No. 3 pick to the Utah Jazz earlier in the day.

The teams announced the trade hours before the draft was to begin. The Jazz also gave Portland the 27th overall pick and a first-round selection in next year's draft that Utah received from Detroit in a trade for point guard Carlos Arroyo.

Webster was the first high school player picked in this year's draft. It was the third year the Blazers took a high school player with their top selection.

Portland took New York prep guard Sebastian Telfair 13th overall in 2004. The year before, the Blazers picked forward Travis Outlaw out of Starkville (Miss.) High School with the 23rd pick.

Webster, at 6-foot-7 and 210 pounds, averaged 27.7 points and 10 rebounds at Seattle Prep last year.

He impressed the Blazers with a workout that included Washington guard Nate Robinson. Webster worked out for nine teams.

"Somebody said he might be the best shooting guard in the draft. There's no doubt about it in my mind," Blazers general manager John Nash said.

Utah used the third pick to select Illinois junior point guard Deron Williams. The Jazz also had 34th and 51st picks entering the draft.

"Our mission was to make optimum use of the third pick overall," Blazers president Steve Patterson said. "We were able to move down only three spots and gain two additional first-round picks. This trade will allow us to continue doing what we started last year, stockpiling young talent."

Patterson added the team was not necessarily finished talking to other teams about deals.

In addition to the 27th pick, the Blazers also had the 35th overall selection Tuesday night.

The Blazers finished 27-55 last season, missing the playoffs for the second straight year after a string of 21 straight postseason appearances.


Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press