Should the NCAA change its stance on endorsements?

ESPN.com asks: Should athletes be able to take endorsement money from a noncollegiate sport and retain eligibility in another?

Updated: March 27, 2007, 5:42 PM ET

CAMPUS CALL: ENDORSEMENT MONEY
Each week, ESPN.com surveys the student-athletes on our panel to see how they feel about a topic that directly affects collegiate life.

Should athletes be able to take endorsement money from a noncollegiate sport and retain eligibility in another?

Hazewinkel
Hazewinkel
"Absolutely. Why not? It is not illegal for a kid on a academic scholarship to only study -- he is allowed to work and it is a good thing if he can get paid doing work he wants to do when he is done with college."
-- Sam Hazewinkel, Oklahoma wrestling


Alexander
Alexander
"No, I do not think they should be able to retain their eligibility if they receive endorsement money in another sport. They are still considered to be amateur athletes, therefore endorsements and special privileges are against the NCAA rules. College is merely four years; if you are that talented, the endorsements will be there once you graduate."
-- Cori Alexander, Portland women's soccer


Henley
Henley
"I definitely think that athletes should be able to take endorsements from a noncollegiate sport and still be eligible to participate in an NCAA-sanctioned sport. This is because receiving money from a noncollegiate sport is very similar to having a job, and the NCAA should not be able to regulate an outside source of income for its athletes. After all, some athletes depend on an outside source of income in order to support themselves while they receive their education."
-- Tyler Henley, Rice baseball


"I don't think this should be possible in college athletics. If you receive money in any sport, then you should be considered a professional and thus forfeit your eligibility. If this is allowed to happen, I think it could become a huge problem."
-- Chase Wileman, SMU men's soccer


Murphy
Murphy
"I think so. This allows the athlete to pursue another sport he or she is passionate about. While the athlete could still pursue a different sport without endorsements, the money from endorsements assists with the costs of travel, training and equipment, almost like scholarships for noncollegiate sports. I think being a multisport athlete is valuable, making someone a superior competitor overall, and allowing for endorsements in noncollegiate sports would permit the small number of NCAA athletes to pursue their other athletic talents as well."
-- Meghan Murphy, Notre Dame women's lacrosse


Leveille
Leveille
"I think athletes should be able to take endorsement money from a noncollegiate sport and retain their eligibility in another. As long as the activities pertain to different sports, I donít believe an athlete should be held down to only one of the sports. Athletes like Jeremy Bloom should be praised for their ability to balance and succeed in two different athletic concentrations."
-- Mike Leveille, Syracuse men's lacrosse


Vetter
Vetter
"Athletes should avoid taking endorsement money from a noncollegiate sport. College allows for athletes to enjoy the sport they love without worrying about all the other factors that come with being a professional athlete. If you think about it, as a scholarship athlete, you are already getting paid to play the sport you love. They should avoid the endorsement money and that will allow college athletes and professional athletes to remain separate."
-- Jessie Vetter, Wisconsin women's hockey

PAST QUESTIONS
What do you think of media coverage?
Rice "Though this is not an issue or story, college baseball and other sports that may not have the revenue of football and men's basketball do not get the coverage I think they deserve. Arguably, athletes from these sports have the same entertainment value and could have significant ratings if given the opportunity. Also, many inspiring stories about individual athletes and teams are left untold because they are not from the mainstream and high-dollar sports."
-- Tyler Henley, Rice baseball

See what the rest of the panel had to say.

How big of a problem is hazing?
Syracuse "I think hazing can be a major problem for athletes and athletic teams. Fortunately, I have never, at any level, been subject or witness to any hazing activities. My athletic teams have always bonded together like families and that removes any chance for hazing to occur."
-- Mike Leveille, Syracuse men's lacrosse

Check out the rest of the panel's answers.

Should schools censor student-athletes' profiles on social-networking sites?
Notre Dame "I do not have a Facebook or MySpace account. I believe it is too much exposure for student-athletes. Student-athletes who have accounts just need to be smart and cautious about what they are posting, for their own safety and privacy."
-- Meghan Murphy, Notre Dame women's lacrosse

See what the rest of the panel had to say.

Is sports gambling a problem on college campuses?
SMU "Sports gambling is a huge issue, there needs to be more attention put on stopping it before it gets huge in the college setting. I don't gamble and I don't know much about gambling, but I do know that a lot of people do it and it could potentially become a huge problem."
-- Chase Wileman, SMU men's soccer

Check out the rest of the panel's answers.

Should athletes be able to turn pro in one sport and retain their eligibility in others?
Boston College "No, I don't think that athletes should be allowed to do this. One of the reasons that NCAA athletics appeal to so many people is the purity involved -- people aren't competing for contracts, endorsements and other monetary incentives. They are simply playing to represent themselves and their school and to try to win a national championship. Although the Notre Dame athletes aren't being paid for football, they are still technically professional athletes, which violates NCAA rules. If one sport doesn't work out, they can always fall back on the other, which to me seems like they can't give all they have to just one sport."
-- Cory Schneider, Boston College men's ice hockey

See what the rest of the panel had to say.