Should alcohol be allowed at college games?

ESPN.com asks: Should the NCAA allow alcohol at collegiate sporting events? Our panel answers.

Updated: May 22, 2007, 2:38 PM ET

CAMPUS CALL: ALCOHOL AT EVENTS
Each week, ESPN.com surveys the student-athletes on our panel to see how they feel about a topic that directly affects collegiate life.

Should alcohol be allowed at collegiate sporting events?

Henley
Henley
"I think the alcohol policy for sporting events should be left up to each school and its athletic department. Alcohol at sporting events tends to make fans more rambunctious. This means there needs to be more security and event staff in the event of unruly fans. If there is not adequate event staff and security, then alcohol should not be served. Alcohol sales are a great way for schools to create revenue, but it does not come without a price."
-- Tyler Henley, Rice baseball


Murphy
Murphy
"I do not think alcohol should be allowed at collegiate sporting events. The focus should be on the athletic competition, and I think the availability of alcohol may detract from this focus."
-- Meghan Murphy, Notre Dame women's lacrosse


Tidwell
Tidwell
"Tailgating is a big part of the fun at many collegiate sporting events and alcohol is usually involved. When used responsibly, alcohol obviously does not pose a threat to anyone or anything. However, as we all know, tailgaters can sometimes get out of hand with alcohol use. It would be idealistic and naive, though, to think that a law banning alcohol from sporting events would be very feasible or enforceable. Instead, law enforcement officers should always be on the scene and ready to deal with those who abuse their privileges."
-- Tyler Tidwell, Navy football


Alexander
Alexander
"College sporting events should be treated just as professional sporting events. Universities are looking to make a profit at these sporting events, and if that means selling alcoholic beverages, I do not have a problem with that -- as long as the laws are abided by and underage drinking does not take place."
-- Cori Alexander, Portland women's soccer


Vetter
Vetter
"I think that if you are over the age of 21, you should be able to have an alcoholic beverage at a sporting event. I think it would actually make it safer at some schools because I know at our games people drink way too much before the game because they know they can't drink during it."
-- Jessie Vetter, Wisconsin women's hockey


Wileman
Wileman
"I think alcohol should be allowed at college sporting events. It would boost attendance for all sports. As long as it is done legally, then I dont think it would be that big of a deal."
-- Chase Wileman, SMU men's soccer


Anosike
Anosike
"Yes, if it's in moderation. I feel that adults who pay to attend the game and pay for a ticket should be allowed to do whatever they feel they need to do to have an enjoyable time."
-- Nicky Anosike, Tennessee women's basketball


PAST QUESTIONS
How should schools handle cutting sports teams?
SMU "This is a huge problem and can be very devastating to people affected. I remember when SMU dropped the men's track program a while back and no one on the team saw it coming. They didn't know what to do or where to go. There has to be at least some prior notification so that it gives time to athletes to sort out their future."
-- Chase Wileman, SMU men's soccer

See what the rest of the panel had to say.

Should athletes have a say in rules changes?
Notre Dame "I think it would be optimal to have a student-athlete voice in the discussion of rules changes. If the changes would be implemented at the collegiate level, I feel it is critical to have the input of those student-athletes. These athletes would be able to offer valuable perspective on the various effects of different rules changes as well as contributing to the discussion of what they think needs to be revised in the rules."
-- Meghan Murphy, Notre Dame women's lacrosse

Check out the rest of the panel's answers.

Should college athletes get more time off?
Cal "Wow, this is a double-edged sword if I've ever encountered one. My first answer is yes, of course we should get more time off. We train year-round and only get selected holidays to be with family -- possibly not even then depending on how far home is from your university. However, collegiate sports are completely voluntary. Yes, I was on full scholarship and yes, if I would have left the team I would have had to pay my own way through college, but that's the nature of life. Many times you have to sacrifice to get what you want, so I sacrificed time with family and friends in order to get an invaluable college education and compete at a championship level in one of the most competitive countries in the world. You can't train half the time and expect to compete well at the collegiate level. Sacrifice is just part of the game."
-- Scott Smith, Cal football

See what the rest of the panel had to say.

Should coaches' contracts include academic incentives?
Navy "Academic incentives for coaches, while they would not be a bad idea, would ultimately prove to be more symbolic than effective. At a highly competitive collegiate level, a coach's main concern is to be successful on the field of play. If they aren't, they will be looking for a new job. Academic motivation should be sparked by professors and must ultimately come from within the student. I think colleges should certainly make sure that athletics do not interfere with academics, but expecting coaches to do much more than make sure their athletes are staying eligible and attending classes may be a little foolhardy."
-- Tyler Tidwell, Navy football

Check out the rest of the panel's answers.