Commentary

Southeast highlighted by ACC prospects

Austin Rivers, James McAdoo and P.J. Hairston among best in the Southeast

Originally Published: April 20, 2011
By Mike LaPlante | ESPN Recruiting

With the high school basketball season wrapping up, here is a look at the top players and biggest surprises in the Southeast for the 2011 class.

Austin Rivers, SG (Winter Park, Fla./Winter Park)
The Duke-bound shooting guard handled being ESPNU's No. 1-rated player throughout most the year, and all the hoopla that comes with it, like a pro. Despite being game planned for each game, the most offensively advanced player in the 2011 class produced big numbers, while leading his team to another state championship.

James McAdoo, PF (Norfolk, Va./Norfolk Christian)
The rich get richer on Tobacco Road, as the future North Carolina Tar Heels player is a smooth, hybrid forward with an old-school game. What he lacks in flash, he more than makes up for in production and he will have a great opportunity to be an impact player for Roy Williams next season.

[+] EnlargeQuincy Miller
Courtesy of Kelly KlineQuincy Miller is the No. 7 player in the 2011 class.

Quincy Miller, PF (North Chicago/Westchester Country Day)
Miller, who is still rehabbing from a season-ending injury, is considered one of the best NBA prospects in the 2011 class. His combination of size and skill will be a great addition to Baylor's program. He and teammate Deuce Bello are heading to Waco, Texas, and expect big things.

Adonis Thomas, SF (Memphis, Tenn./Melrose)
He is very talented and a terrific person who makes your program better. His overall skills are very strong and put him in position to get a lot done on the floor, but it's the intangibles that stick out. Thomas is a coach's dream who wins not only games, but championships, while leaving a lasting impression on your program.

P.J. Hairston, SG (Greensboro, N.C./Hargrave Military Academy)
Hairston, a North Carolina native, is an explosive scorer with deep shooting range who adds another outside threat to the Tar Heels backcourt. His ability to finish through contact in transition will also be a perfect fit within North Carolina's up-tempo attack.

Josiah Turner, PG (Sacramento, Calif./Quality Education Academy)
Although it is odd to be talking about one of the top left-coasters as a Southeast player, his exodus from Sacramento, Calif., to Winston-Salem, N.C., in late January was the Southeast's and Quality Education Academy's gain. Arizona fans are going to love his speed, quickness and ability to score from the point.

Dorian Finney-Smith, SF (Portsmouth, Va./Norcom)
Heading to Virginia Tech, Finney-Smith is one of the great steals of the 2011 class. His unassuming nature off the court is Jekyll & Hyde-like, as he turns into a monster who fills a box score once the ball is tipped. Hokies fans are going to love this kid.

Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, SG (Greenville, Ga./Greenville)
The pressure is on for Caldwell-Pope, as he has been hailed as a potential impact player who can lead the Bulldogs to the promised land or at least become a pied piper of sorts who will open the door for more of Georgia's top talent to flow into Athens.

Dom Pointer, SF (Roseville, Mich./Quality Education Academy)
Coach Steve Lavin and the Johnnies cornered the market early and snatched up a good one before his stock soared. Pointer, who began the summer outside the ESPNU 100, rose through the ranks the old fashioned way: he earned it. The blue-collar worker brings it each time he takes the floor.

Michael Gbinije, SF (Chester, Va./Benedictine)
Gbinije not only has a cool name, but a cool game to match. He is a perfect fit for Duke's program because he has excellent fundamentals and plays with an unselfish, team-first mentality. Don't let his unselfish demeanor fool you, though, he may be a great teammate but he has no affection for the competition.

Five surprises

Dai-Jon Parker, SG (Alpharetta, Ga./Milton)
The Vanderbilt signee is a high achiever on and off the court. Parker's explosiveness and ability to score will be a great fit within Kevin Stallings' system. He has been well-coached at the high school level, has a college-ready body and will have the potential to be a defensive stopper early in his Commodores career.

Shannon Scott, PG (Alpharetta/Milton)
When you consider Parker's backcourt-mate, Scott, it is easy to see why Milton High School has been so successful during the past few years. The future Ohio State Buckeyes player knows how to run a team and can take over a game when the situation calls for it. With Scott, Ohio State's backcourt, specifically at the point, becomes as deep as any in the country.

Marshall Plumlee, C (Warsaw, Ind./Christ School)
Plum III has been one of my favorite players in the 2011 class because of his approach to the game. He is all about doing whatever it takes to win and does a lot of the things that don't always show up in the box score. Joining his brothers Miles and Mason, he continues the Plumlee tradition to Duke but will try to leave his own mark on the storied program.

Ky Madden, SG (Lepanto, Ark./East Poinsett County)
Madden's recruitment was an interesting tale that generated a lot of interest, as everyone tried to predict where he would end up. He has a sister at Baylor, Ole Miss was close to home and Arkansas had already secured the services of his Arkansas Wings teammates. The call of the Hogs was too strong, and he ended up inking with the in-state program, giving them a top-5 recruiting class.

Trevor Lacey, SG (Huntsville, Ala./S.R. Butler)
If you are ever at a poker table and Lacey sits down, grab your money and leave. The highly skilled combo-guard, who has won three state championships in his high school career, has patiently maneuvered the recruiting process and is still unspoken as to his college choice. It has been tough to read which way his future direction may be leaning, but the highest-rated player remaining on the board is going to make some program very happy.

Adam Finkelstein has been a coach or scout at the high school, college and pro levels. He was an assistant coach in Division I by the age of 24 and also worked as a scout for Marty Blake, the NBA's director of scouting.