Dream comes true for Fisher at Jordan Classic

Originally Published: April 22, 2007
By Jamar Hudson | Scouts Inc.

NEW YORK -- When Corey Fisher took the floor at Madison Square Garden Saturday night, he was living a dream.

Yet, in the midst of his excitement, Fisher dreamt again. Only this time, his mind drifted into the future, and what he saw was the next four years and the possibilities of playing on the same floor for a Big East Tournament championship one day.

The 6-foot, 175-pound point guard from Elizabeth, N.J. will be attending Villanova in the fall. And in front of a star-studded crowd at the 2007 Jordan Brand All-American Classic that included Spike Lee, Chris Paul, Eddie George and of course, Michael Jordan, Fisher gave Villanova and Big East fans alike a glimpse into the future as he scored 12 points and dished out 10 assists to lead the Jordan Yellow team to a 127-119 win over Jordan Royal.

"All week, we've just been having fun and competing with each other in scrimmages," Fisher said.

Donte Green (L) and Corey Fisher #11
Ned Dishman/Getty ImagesDonte Greene (L) and Corey Fisher of the Yellow team received the Most Valuable Player awards for the 2007 Jordan Brand All-American Classic.
Although Fisher finished just 4-of-14 from the floor, he was named Most Valuable Player for the Jordan Yellow, controlling the tempo for his team which trailed once the entire game.

"This is a dream come true," Fisher said. "This is where the Big East tournament is played and I feel it's the best conference in America. "I can't wait to play on the Big East stage and in the tournament against some of the great players I played against tonight."

One of those players Fisher faced Saturday and will face over the next few years is Donte Greene. The 6-9 Syracuse-bound power forward led Jordan Royal with 20 points on 7-of-12 shooting and was named Most Valuable Player for his team.

"This was my last high school All-American game and my last high school game period," Greene said. "You only get this chance once in a lifetime, so I felt I had to go out there and have fun so I can have a lot of memories."

Like Fisher, Green was able to use this game as a confidence builder as he prepares to enter Big East competition next year.

The two, along with Austin Freeman (Georgetown) and Chris Wright (Georgetown) all will be key pieces for their respective teams. They used this week to get a head start at the conference rivalry, which naturally includes trash-talking.

"We were all talking," said Fisher. "We've been having good competition all week.

"That's what basketball is all about. There are no hard feelings, we just play together and against each other on the court."

Jeff Robinson, who will play for coach John Calipari and Memphis next year, led Jordan Yellow with 17 points. Eric Gordon (Indiana), Kyle Singler (Duke) and Freeman added 16 points each.

For Singler, widely considered one of the best all-around players in the class of 2007, the opportunity to play on basketball's biggest stage was a far cry from what he was used to having played his high school in small Medford, Ore.

""It pushes you to limits where you usually don't get pushed, especially coming from a small town like me," Singler said. "There's a lot of history in this building, and to come out here and play against some great competition is definitely a memory that's going to last forever."

Arizona signee Jerryd Bayless scored 17 points and 7-foot center Kosta Koufos (Ohio State) scored 14 points and grabbed eight rebounds.

Jeffrey Jordan, playing on the same court where his father had so many memorable moments, added nine points for Jordan Royal. Having to deal with the constant comparisons, the younger Jordan doesn't let it affect his game.

"I think it was pressure enough being out there with some of the best players in the country," the younger Jordan said. "I wasn't going to go out and put any pressure on myself. It was a good experience."

Jordan, who is undecided, said he was considering Illinois, Northwestern, Valparaiso, Davidson and George Washington.

Due to NBA ownership rules, the elder Jordan was unable to talk with the players at length. Yet, with him watching attentively and his logo donning the court, uniform and shoes, his presence was felt.

""Once he walked in (before the game), everyone was surprised," Fisher said. "I was real nervous, but it was an honor to meet him, the greatest player in the game."

For Fisher, it was another part of the dream.

Jamar Hudson is an Associate Editor for ESPN.com. He may be reached at jamar.hudson@espn3.com.