Ohio State hasn't started calling coaches

Updated: June 16, 2004, 8:22 AM ET
ESPN.com news services

Texas Tech may not have a lock on coach Bob Knight.

Although Knight agreed to a three-year contract extension that could keep him in Lubbock through 2009, he would listen if Ohio State called about the vacancy created by Jim O'Brien's firing, ESPN.com's Andy Katz reports.

Influential people in the basketball community have called Ohio State on Knight's behalf, but not at his urging, Katz reports. Knight was born in Massillon, Ohio, and played at Ohio State (1958-62).

It's unclear whether Ohio State is interested in Knight. The Buckeyes' list includes Xavier's Thad Matta, Marquette's Tom Crean, Rutgers' Gary Waters, and N.C. State's Herb Sendek, Katz reports. Ohio State hasn't started contacting potential replacements.

Texas Tech athletic director Gerald Myers told The Associated Press last Wednesday that the extension with Knight probably would be signed this week. Knight's contract pays him $250,000 a year and runs through May 2006.

Knight needs 48 victories to overtake Dean Smith (879) as the winningest coach in Division I.

"I look forward to doing this a long time," Knight told the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal last week. "This is the best possible situation for me as long as I coach."

He will begin his fourth season at Tech -- his 39th overall -- with 832 wins. He is the victory leader among active coaches following the retirement of Jim Phelan of Mount St. Mary's in 2003.

Knight was hired by Texas Tech in 2001, six months after he was fired by Indiana for what then-school president Myles Brand called his "pattern of unacceptable behavior."

On the court, Knight has led the Red Raiders to three consecutive seasons of at least 20 wins and postseason appearances -- a feat never before achieved at the school. Before his arrival, Tech hadn't had a winning season in four years. Tech is 68-33 under Knight.

Knight's current five-year contract is worth $4.5 million. In addition to the $250,000 in base pay, he was given $150,000 in deferred annual income and $500,000 in guaranteed outside income through May 2006.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

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