Salt Lake City paper reports honor code violations

Updated: February 23, 2004, 8:23 PM ET
Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY -- Four Brigham Young football players have allegedly been kicked off the team for violating the Mormon church school's honor code at a party that included alcohol and sex, The Salt Lake Tribune reported Saturday.

The newspaper, which did not cite a source in the copyright story, said an investigation into honor code violations is complete and an appeal process has begun.

A story published by the Deseret Morning News in its Saturday edition said at least five BYU football players would be disciplined.

The university would not confirm nor comment on any disciplinary action, citing the ongoing process of investigating honor code violations.

"The honor code process is not complete and so officially there have been no expulsions, suspensions, probations, or anything at this point," Jeff Reynolds, associate director of athletic communications, told The Associated Press on Saturday.

BYU spokeswoman Carri Jenkins confirmed that the school was "nearing completion" of a review that involved more than one student.

According to The Salt Lake Tribune, the school investigated an off-campus party where a female student claimed to have been raped by several football players Jan. 19. The woman later told police the sex was consensual, but she said she was raped because she was embarrassed and did not want to get in trouble for violating the honor code at the school owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

The code prohibits drinking alcohol and engaging in premarital or extramarital sex.

No criminal charges have been filed against any players, Jenkins said.

According to university protocol, after the honor code office completes an investigation, students have five days to appeal any decision. The university can release the name of the student and confirm any disciplinary action only if the student signs a waiver releasing such information, Jenkins said.

The school could confirm or deny information in certain exceptions, such as if the name of a student became public record or if students approached the media themselves, she said.


Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press

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