Ex-OU lineman critical of dismissal from team

Updated: April 5, 2007, 7:49 AM ET
Associated Press

TULSA, Okla. -- A former Oklahoma football player who was kicked off the team with former quarterback Rhett Bomar says he believes his dismissal was unfair.

"All I did was take cash. I didn't break any laws and I get kicked off the team, but there's people on the team that are breaking laws and failing drug tests and stuff like that, and there's nobody getting kicked off the team for that type of stuff."
-- J.D. Quinn

Former offensive lineman J.D. Quinn and Bomar were permanently dismissed from the team the day before the start of practice last fall for taking money for hours they did not work at a Norman auto dealership.

Quinn, who transferred to Montana, told the Tulsa World he didn't understand why he and Bomar were kicked off the team Aug. 2.

"All I did was take cash," Quinn said. "I didn't break any laws and I get kicked off the team, but there's people on the team that are breaking laws and failing drug tests and stuff like that, and there's nobody getting kicked off the team for that type of stuff."

Quinn declined to provide details of his allegations about other players, but said it was not necessarily about players on the OU team.

"I was just saying around the country. I wasn't saying it in the context of Oklahoma. There's just people I've heard of doing things."

Bomar, now at Sam Houston State, declined comment through a university spokesman.

OU football coach Bob Stoops also declined comment, other than associate athletic director Kenny Mossman saying, "the university has turned over all of our material to the NCAA and we stand by that dialogue."

OU goes before the NCAA Infractions Committee in Indianapolis on April 14 to defend itself on an allegation that the university failed to adequately monitor the employment of athletes at the Norman car dealership.

A university investigation determined Quinn was paid $8,137.17 and Bomar $7,406.88 beyond the hours they actually worked.

The NCAA forbids student-athletes from receiving benefits that are not also available to non-student-athletes, including benefits from off-campus employment.

Both players were ordered to pay restitution to a charity of their choice as terms of their reinstatement and both lost one season of eligibility.

Quinn, of Garland, Texas, said he donated $5,000 to the Dallas chapter of the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation and will donate the remainder of his restitution to the same foundation when he gets the money.


Copyright 2007 by The Associated Press

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