Bob Griese retires from broadcasting

Updated: February 3, 2011, 7:56 PM ET
ESPN.com news services

Hall of Fame quarterback Bob Griese is retiring from broadcasting after 29 years, including the last 24 on ESPN and ABC.

"I've had a wonderful career and now it's time to experience new things," Griese said in a statement. "I've had many highlights along the way, from working the NFL's Super Bowl and college football's championship games to covering many of my son Brian's games during his undefeated season in 1997. I want to thank ABC, ESPN and the fans for their support and all the men and women on our TV crews for their patience and support through the years."

Griese
Griese

ESPN made the announcement Thursday on Griese's 66th birthday.

Griese, a member of both the Pro and College Football Halls of Fame, worked ESPN's Saturday noon college football telecasts the past two seasons. He started his TV career with NBC, serving as the top NFL analyst from 1982 to 1986 and calling the Super Bowl.

Griese worked many top bowl games for ABC and ESPN, including the last of son Brian's career at the 1998 Rose Bowl, when Bob cried as Brian was honored as the MVP for undefeated Michigan.

Brian is now also a college football commentator for ESPN, and father and son called the Minnesota-Purdue game together Oct. 16.

"Sports fans have greatly benefited from the insights of Bob Griese," ESPN executive vice president Norby Williamson said in a statement. "After a Hall of Fame playing career, he made the transition to become an elite broadcaster at the top of his field for three decades. We wish him continued success and enjoyment as he begins the next phase of his life."

Griese, who was a two-time All-American and runner-up for the 1966 Heisman Trophy at Purdue, spent his 14-year professional career with the Miami Dolphins, who made him the fourth overall pick in the 1967 draft. The Dolphins won three AFC championships and two Super Bowls -- and also had an undefeated 17-0 season in 1972 -- with Griese, who went to six Pro Bowls.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.