<
>

Freshman Moss rushes for 91 yards

11/15/2003

MIAMI (AP) -- Quarterback Brock Berlin might have some company on
Miami's bench.

Freshman Tyrone Moss ran 16 times for 91 yards in the second
half, and the 14th-ranked Hurricanes rebounded from their first
two-game losing streak in more than four years to beat Syracuse
17-10 on Saturday.

Moss gave the offense a spark after it scored just one touchdown
in losses to Virginia Tech and Tennessee.

Now he might keep Jarrett Payton on the sideline.

"Tyrone's going to get a lot of carries," coach Larry Coker
said.

The Hurricanes (8-2, 4-1 Big East) altered their offensive
philosophy against the Orangemen -- taking a page from the teams
that beat them.

They ran the ball 49 times, hoping to eliminate turnovers while
relying on the defense -- which has played well the last eight
games.

"You've got to win the surest way," Coker said. "We lost the
surest way the last two weeks."

Miami significantly outgained the Hokies and Volunteers, but
lost both games because of a combined eight turnovers and 26
penalties.

Coker made several changes this week. He benched Berlin, tight
end Kellen Winslow and center Joel Rodriguez. He also vowed to get
Moss more playing time.

It worked, barely.

Miami trailed 10-7 in the fourth quarter before scoring 10
straight points to stay in the hunt for the conference title and a
berth in a Bowl Championship Series game. If the Hurricanes beat
Rutgers and No. 16 Pittsburgh, they will win the conference title
and earn a BCS berth, probably in the Orange Bowl.

"You'd be surprised how much one win can change our outlook,"
safety Maurice Sikes said. "Getting this win gives us a whole
different attitude."

After Kellen Pruitt partially blocked a punt, Syracuse (5-4,
2-3) got the ball back on the Miami 44 with 2:58 to play. But
Miami's defense -- which played well in the two losses -- stopped the
Orangemen on fourth-and-8 from the 20.

Sikes knocked down R.J. Anderson's pass to Johnnie Morant in the
left corner of the end zone with 52 seconds remaining.

Derrick Crudup ran out the clock from there.

Crudup, starting in place of Berlin, was mediocre in his first
career start. He was 5-of-13 for 80 yards with a touchdown, an
interception and a fumble. He also ran 14 times for 29 yards.

"I think I can do much better than I did today," Crudup said.
"But we got the win. That's all that matters."

Coker benched Berlin after the junior quarterback threw 17
interceptions and fumbled three times in the first nine games.

Berlin played one series Saturday, receiving a spattering of
boos when he entered the game early in the second quarter. Berlin
misfired on his only pass, was sacked once and never returned.

Crudup probably will keep the starting job next week against
Rutgers.

His best throw came in the first quarter, when he faked left and
hit Ryan Moore down the right sideline for a 45-yard score and a
7-3 lead.

"He did some good things," Coker said. "He was a little rusty
with some things, but I was really pleased with the way he
competed."

After falling behind 10-7 at halftime, Miami turned to Moss. His
biggest runs came on Miami's final scoring drive.

Moss used a great move to break a 26-yard run. He then ran over
Anthony Smith and carried Rich Scanlon into the end zone for a
9-yard score.

"They stopped throwing the ball around," Syracuse coach Paul
Pasqualoni said. "They came right at us. I thought one of the
biggest factors was the yardage Moss made. He made yards after the
initial contact.

"He's a good back. The problem was we didn't even know him.
They have so many great backs we didn't even know him."

Syracuse scored all its points off Crudup's two turnovers in the
first half. Walter Reyes led the Orangemen with 89 yards on 24
carries.

After Miami's third turnover -- a fumble by Winslow on his only
catch -- Miami stopped throwing the ball and relied on its defense.

"We don't have to score 50 points with our defense to win,"
left tackle Eric Winston said. "We just have to control the ball
and play field position. No one's going to score on our defense. We
just have to hold onto the ball and keep pounding it. You saw a
clear example of what happens when we do that."