Commentary

Tuesday start, Wednesday win for A.J.?

Tuesday's suspension affords Burnett chance at season's fifth win on Wednesday

Updated: May 26, 2010, 10:07 AM ET
By Andrew Marchand | ESPNNewYork.com

MINNEAPOLIS -- A.J. Burnett will not step on the mound Wednesday, but he could get the win.

In an oddity that allows games to be resumed where they left off, Burnett may be able to pick up the victory even though he won't actually throw a pitch.

The Yankees-Twins game was suspended on Tuesday night with no score after five innings. Joe Girardi will not put Burnett back on the mound Wednesday, but if the Yankees can take the lead in the sixth and win, Burnett would get his fifth victory of the season.

Girardi likes the new rule that the game is resumed at 5:05 p.m. ET, prior to the regularly scheduled 7:10 p.m. ET.

"I like what baseball has done where you don't start over," Girardi said.

Girardi declined to say who would start the sixth for his team. He felt his bullpen is rested enough to handle what will be at least 14 innings of baseball on Wednesday.

A rain delay in Minneapolis is a rarity. In this first season at Target Field, the Twins had a game postponed once, but Tuesday was the first in-game delay. The Twins hadn't seen one of those at home since Sept. 26, 1981.

Does Girardi miss the roof?

"This is a beautiful ballpark," Girardi said.

He is right, except when it rains.

Game notes

The Yankees' 3-4-5 hitters continue to struggle, especially No. 3. Mark Teixeira hit into a double play to end the first. In the fourth, with two on and no out, he meekly popped out. Next, Alex Rodriguez struck out and Robinson Cano flew out to center.

"I have a good feeling we are going to bounce back," Teixeira said afterward.

Andrew Marchand covers baseball for ESPNNewYork.com. You can follow him on Twitter.

More from ESPNNewYork.com

Andrew Marchand is a senior writer for ESPNNewYork. He also regularly contributes to SportsCenter, Baseball Tonight, ESPNews, ESPN New York 98.7 FM and ESPN Radio. He joined ESPN in 2007 after nine years at the New York Post. Follow Andrew on Twitter »

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