NFL Trust sharing arrangement to continue

Commissioner Paul Tagliabue anticipates passage of a resolution to extend the NFL Trust, a sharing arrangement involving trademarks and team logos and sponsorships that generate $4 million of annual income to teams. The usual three-quarters majority vote is required, meaning only 24 teams need to support the measure as opposed to all 32 teams.

Updated: March 29, 2004, 5:08 PM ET
By John Clayton | ESPN.com

Commissioner Paul Tagliabue anticipates passage of a resolution to extend the NFL Trust, a sharing arrangement involving trademarks and team logos and sponsorships that generates $4 million of annual income to each team. The usual three-quarters majority vote is required, meaning only 24 teams need to support the measure as opposed to all 32 teams.

"The NFL is different from other leagues," Bills owner Ralph Wilson said. "Revenue sharing is very important."

Some teams such as the Cowboys would prefer marketing their hats and logos on their own. The Trust runs out Wednesday, but Tagliabue believes the current system doesn't need to be altered.

"This resolution basically conforms to what we've been doing for the last four years," Tagliabue said.

Wilson adds another important point.

"How many Cowboy hats is he (Jerry Jones) going to sell in Buffalo," Wilson said. "Not too many. Nor are we going to sell Bills hats in Dallas."

The resolution, if passed, would extend the NFL Trust for 15 years.

Opening with a bang

The commissioner was thrilled at the opening slate of national games announced for the first week of the regular season.

On Thursday, Sept. 9, the Indianapolis Colts visit the New England Patriots. The Fox national game on Sept. 12 is the Dallas Cowboys at the Minnesota Vikings. The Sunday night features an AFC West rivalry, the Kansas City Chiefs at the Denver Broncos.

The Monday night game features the Packers at the Carolina Panthers.

"It's great to open the season with a rematch of the AFC Championship game and having the Super Bowl champs playing the team they faced to get to the Super Bowl," Taglilabue said.

John Clayton is a senior writer for ESPN.com.

John Clayton

NFL senior writer

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