Moss looking for more yards after catch

Randy Moss has added weight in an effort to fight through more tackles.

Updated: May 11, 2004, 1:02 PM ET
By John Clayton | ESPN.com

Randy Moss
Moss
Randy Moss isn't going to let a lingering case of plantar fasciitis in his left foot slow down the pain the Vikings' offense hopes to inflict on opposing defensives. Mike Tice is stressing yards after the catch, in which the Vikings finished second to the Chiefs last season. Moss finished fifth among wide receivers with 439 yards after the catch, and he's added 15 pounds to better fight through tackles. Moss even paid $10,000 to buy a coaches' computer, which allows him to download breakdowns of every play. Six teammates followed Moss' lead and made similar purchases.

Next up in Denver

At 5-7, 195 pounds, Quentin Griffin may not look like the workhorse back needed to replace Clinton Portis, but he's going to be given every chance. Griffin ran with the first team at the Broncos' mini-camp and is only 10 pounds lighter than Portis. Mike Shanahan saw enough of Griffin in his 136-yard, 28-carry game against the Colts last December to convince him he didn't need to take Steven Jackson in the first round after trading Portis to Washington. Griffin has 4.4 speed and great hands.

New No. 81 in San Francisco

Rashaun Woods not only inherited Terrell Owens' position at flanker for the 49ers, but he grabbed his No. 81. Woods had the choice of 81, 88 and 89 and took Owens' number because it was close to his college number of 82. Like Owens, Woods doesn't have blazing speed but gets good separation from corners. He's also displayed exceptional hands. The only difference is this No. 81 is a little quieter than the past model.

The fading fullback

Pro Bowl fullbacks Fred Beasley of the 49ers and Tony Richardson of the Chiefs don't have to worry about job security, but they have to wonder what's happened to their position. Only three fullbacks were drafted last month, and the Redskins and Vikings eliminated the position. The increase in spread offenses in colleges is taking those 240-pound blocking backs such as Lorenzo Neal and Cory Schlesinger and developing them at other positions, making it harder for scouts to find draftable fullbacks.

John Clayton is a senior writer for ESPN.com.

John Clayton

NFL senior writer

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