Vick doing well in new offense

So far Michael Vick is adjusting just fine to the version of the West Coast offense the Falcons are using.

Updated: September 21, 2004, 5:40 PM ET
By John Clayton | ESPN.com

Michael Vick
Quarterback
Atlanta Falcons
Profile
2004 SEASON STATISTICS
Att Comp PaTD RuTD Int Rat
41 27 2 0 1 97.8
Jim Mora said during Michael Vick's 29-play preseason that he wasn't installing a pure West Coast offense, and now we see why. Vick is running a hybrid West Coast offense, which features Mike Shanahan's zone-running schemes from Denver and the moving pocket that worked so well for Jeff Garcia in San Francisco. Except for most third-down plays, when defensive ends are flying into the backfield, Vick can make plays on the run, which is his specialty.

Falcons coaches are most pleased with Vick's first-half numbers. Through two games, he's 18 for 22 for 248 yards and two touchdowns and a 144 quarterback rating, which shows Vick's precision in following the opening 15-play script while still making necessary adjustments.

Who needs training camp?

It appears that Charles Woodson has dispelled the need for training camp. The franchise cornerback missed all of the Raiders' camp, yet has allowed only two completions in man coverage in two games, a 13-yarder to Plaxico Burress and a fluke 5-yard touchdown pass to Eric Moulds that was tipped off the hands of teammate Phillip Buchanon.

DeShaun Foster
Running Back
Carolina Panthers
Profile
2004 SEASON STATISTICS
Rush Yds TD Rec Yds TD
35 186 1 4 22 0
Holding the ball

DeShaun Foster knows his fumbling history is a matter of concentration. His preseason fumbles against the Patriots were caused by allowing his ball-carrying arm to stray away from his frame in trying to gain extra yards on outside runs. Foster focused on cradling the ball and doing more inside runs in his 32-carry, 174-yard game in the Panthers' victory over the Chiefs, a style he plans to continue while filling in for the injured Stephen Davis.

Big Ben

Ben Roethlisberger's biggest adjustment during his six-week fill-in role for the injured Tommy Maddox will be gaining comfort as a conventional drop-back quarterback. Roethlisberger worked more than 50 percent of his college snaps out of the shotgun and had his best success throwing on the run. When he replaced Maddox Sunday against the Ravens, he got to use the shotgun because the Steelers were so far behind. Roethlisberger won't have that luxury as a starter, beginning this Sunday in Miami.

John Clayton is a senior writer for ESPN.com.

John Clayton

NFL senior writer

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