Feely has made 77 percent of his kicks

Updated: March 7, 2005, 11:59 AM ET
By Len Pasquarelli | ESPN.com

For the third season in a row, the New York Giants will have a new kicker, as ESPN.com has learned that the team has reached agreement with unrestricted free agent Jay Feely.

Jay Feely
Kicker
Atlanta Falcons
Profile
2004 SEASON STATISTICS
FG Att PAT Att Pts Long
18 23 40 40 94 47

A four-year veteran who played his entire career with the Atlanta Falcons, Feely replaces Steve Christie, who converted on 22 of 28 field goal attempts in 2004. Contract details were not immediately available.

Feely, 28, was bumped from his job last week, when the Falcons reached agreement with 11-year veteran Todd Peterson on a one-year contract. Atlanta had made Feely an offer last week but attached a deadline to it. Rather than accept the deal, Feely opted to test the market and quickly found a new team.

New York has struggled in recent seasons to land a kicker who could bring stability and continuity to the position and the Giants hope Feely is the answer.

Discovered by Atlanta scouts in a free agent kicking camp in 2001, the former University of Michigan standout has a strong leg and has converted 77.2 percent of his field goals (98 of 127) during his career. Inexplicably, however, Feely struggled at times kicking in the Georgia Dome, connecting on just 52 of 70 field goals there in four years.

For his career, Feely has 436 points, and that includes 100-point performances in each of his first two NFL seasons. He scored a career-high 138 points in '02, when he converted a career-best 32 field goals. But then he slumped in 2003, making only 70.4 percent of his tries.

After hitting 79.2 percent of his field goal attempts in 2001-2002, Feely fell off to a conversion rate of just 74.0 percent in 2003-2004. He averaged 91.5 points in the last two seasons as opposed to 126.5 points his first two years.

Feely had also drawn interest from other teams in free agency, including Tampa Bay.

Len Pasquarelli is a senior NFL writer for ESPN.com. To check out Len's chat archive, click here Insider.

ALSO SEE