QB has a ride, but will he pick it up?

Updated: July 1, 2004, 8:57 PM ET
By Darren Rovell | ESPN.com

Tom Brady's new car has arrived, though it's not clear if he'll ever get behind the wheel.

As the Super Bowl XXXVIII MVP, the New England Patriots quarterback was awarded the right to select a Cadillac model as part of the General Motors' brand official vehicle sponsorship of the Super Bowl.

When Tom Brady said he'd rather have an XLR Roadster, GM met his request.

On Thursday, a Cadillac official confirmed that the car had been delivered to a dealership in Massachusetts and that the reason for the delay was a combination of car scarcity and Brady changing his mind about the model he wanted.

Brady, who as Super Bowl MVP in 2002 received his Cadillac Escalade within weeks of leading the Patriots to victory over the St. Louis Rams, told ESPN's Chris Mortensen on Tuesday that he was upset that he had not yet received his order for this year's car.

"I'm not driving [the] car, that's for sure," Brady said. "It's the damndest thing I ever heard. It's ridiculous."

At a news conference in Houston the day after the Super Bowl, Brady signed an oversized order form for his new car: a Cadillac Escalade ESV Platinum with 20-inch rims. But the car, which has a retail value of $69,900, wasn't in production yet, so Cadillac officials said they informed Brady's agent, Steve Dubin, that the car would take longer to roll out.

However, in late April, Dubin called a GM executive and requested the order be changed to an XLR Roadster, according to Cadillac spokesman Jeff Kuhlman.

"We only made about 5,000 of those cars and all of them were sold already," Kuhlman said. "So to come through on our promise, we put another one in production for Tom."

Kuhlman said that given Brady's change of heart, the car, which has a retail value of $76,200, arrived at the dealer this week in fairly rapid fashion.

"We're disappointed Tom is upset," Kuhlman said. "Until now, we've had a good relationship with him and we hope he's happy with his car."

Dubin declined to comment on the details of the story.

Darren Rovell, who covers sports business for ESPN.com, can be reached at Darren.Rovell@espn3.com.

Darren Rovell | email

ESPN.com Sports Business reporter