Jones' family concerned about his choices, friends

Updated: March 1, 2007, 9:16 AM ET
ESPN.com news services

Members of Adam "Pacman" Jones' family told The Tennessean of Nashville that his involvement in an incident at a Las Vegas strip club has them concerned about his well-being, his decisions and his choice of friends.

Pacman Jones
Jones

His grandmother, Willie Louise Davis, has her own painful memory and reason to worry. Her son Adam -- Pacman Jones' father -- was shot and killed when Pacman was only 5 years old.

"He is the only child my son had, and I worry every day about him. I got this age number -- if he can just make it to 26, I think he'll be OK," Davis told The Tennessean. "But his daddy didn't make it past 26. I worry, and I hope and pray that [Pacman] can go beyond that and many, many more years. Me and his mother both talk about that all the time."

"Everybody tries to talk to him," his uncle, Robert Jones, told the newspaper. "I do. His mother talks to him, his grandparents talk to him. ... I don't know, I just think he is out of control. I've told him I think he is out of damn control, but he doesn't want to hear it."

"I hate to say things on the negative because I want to see him do good. But it is hard to see him keep getting involved in stuff like this," he told The Tennessean.

"Stuff like this" was an incident Feb. 19, in which police say Jones threw thousands of dollars on the stage at the Minxx Gentleman's Club and Lounge. A disagreement followed when some of the dancers tried to pick up the cash, and the incident ended in a triple shooting that left one of the victims, a club security guard who was shot in the chest, paralyzed.

"He is the only child my son had, and I worry every day about him. I got this age number -- if he can just make it to 26, I think he'll be OK. ... But his daddy didn't make it past 26. I worry, and I hope and pray that [Pacman] can go beyond that and many, many more years. Me and his mother both talk about that all the time."
-- Willie Louise Davis, Pacman Jones' grandmother.

Las Vegas police haven't identified a suspect in the case, and Jones' attorneys have said he was interviewed as a witness, not as a suspect.

But it was the eighth incident involving Jones since the Tennessee Titans selected the defensive back in the 2005 NFL draft.

The Tennessean said its attempts to reach Pacman Jones for the story were unsuccessful.

Titans coach Jeff Fisher said last week that he has not talked with Jones, and the Titans are leaving the investigation to Las Vegas police.

"There have been numerous incidents, but once we're able to gather the facts on this one, we'll be able to address his future and those other types of things," Fisher said.

"He said it's going to show he wasn't involved, but maybe he is putting himself in the position to getting the criticism he gets. That is just being real," Robert Jones told the newspaper. "I have told him about trying to be in the right place at the right time so much instead of always being in the wrong place at the wrong time, and it kind of goes on deaf ears."

Pacman Jones' grandfather, Claude Jones, told the newspaper he's concerned about his grandson's association with particular friends and hangers-on.

"Overall, he just seems to be hanging with the wrong people," he told the newspaper. "The hangers-on just seem to keep staying around him and bringing him down."

Robert Jones is also concerned about his nephew's entourage.

"Pacman just draws attention to himself with the way he carries himself. He goes into clubs with six cats that call themselves 'security.' Well, what kind of attention do you think that's going get? He doesn't need all that," he told The Tennessean. "They know he's there, but he has all these cats surrounding him like he's the Buddha or somebody.

"And a lot of people around him don't have his best interest at heart," he continued. "I tell him, just like I'm telling you, but he'll leave me or go on out the room when I am talking to him. He knows right and wrong, I guarantee you that. But he just thinks the dollar bill can get you out of everything. Well, the dollar bill isn't always going to get you out of this [stuff]."

Jones attended a birthday party for his 1-year-old daughter in Atlanta last weekend. Family members who were present told The Tennessean that the incident was not discussed at the party.

But that doesn't mean they're not thinking about it.

"The baby was the main focus of the weekend, and he was real happy for his baby. But deep down inside I can see a little fear in him," Davis told the newspaper. "Deep down in my heart, I know he didn't do any of this. I can tell when he is guilty. I can tell when he does something he isn't supposed to do. I know Pacman, and I know he didn't do this."

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

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