Harrison's name was in clinic records via illegal prescription

Updated: September 6, 2007, 9:54 AM ET
ESPN.com news services

New England Patriots safety Rodney Harrison made no effort to disguise his name or address when he purchased human growth hormone over the Internet and was cooperative with investigators, law enforcement officials said, according to The Boston Globe.

According to the report, prosecutors said Harrison, who met in Foxborough, Mass. last week with investigators for the Albany County (N.Y.) District Attorney's office, acknowledged he bought HGH "more than once" online last year with an illegal prescription provided by a doctor associated with a Florida wellness clinic. He said he sought the prescription to help him recover faster from shoulder and knee injuries.

Harrison, who has been suspended for four games for violating the NFL's banned susbstance policy, is not facing any criminal charges in the case.

"I was quite impressed with Mr. Harrison's response when he was confronted with the issue," P. David Soares, the Albany DA, told the Globe. "I commend him for immediately taking responsibility and being completely cooperative and forthright."

Chris Baynes, an Albany assistant DA, told the Globe that Harrison bought the HGH from the Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center with a prescription allegedly signed by a doctor who never examined him. The law requires doctors to see patients before they write prescriptions, and the doctor, Robert G. Carlson, has pleaded guilty in the case.

Harrison's name appeared in the clinic's records, as did the name of Dallas Cowboys quarterbacks coach Wade Wilson, who was suspended five games and fined.

Soares also complemented the Patriots and the NFL for their cooperation, explaining that the Patriots protected the integrity of the investigation by not giving Harrison information that could have helped him change his story, had he chosen to do so.

"We've had experience with confronting people with this kind of information and they are not forthcoming and cooperative," Soares told the Globe. "Any time they are willing to sit down at the table and be honest and forthright, you have to admire that."

ALSO SEE