Vick hoping to get $4.5 million for sale of lakefront Georgia home

Updated: October 20, 2007, 6:46 PM ET
By Len Pasquarelli | ESPN.com

ATLANTA -- In the latest indication that Michael Vick won't be returning to the Atlanta Falcons, the suspended quarterback has listed his suburban home here for sale, with a price tag of $4.5 million.

Vick purchased the sprawling lakefront home, which is in the exclusive Sugarloaf Country Club gated community in Duluth, Ga., and sits on a 1½-acre tract, in April 2005 for $3.8 million. It carries a monthly mortgage of $23,063 and the annual property taxes are $26,700.

The European-style home features a white, stucco exterior, Cathedral ceilings, eight bedrooms, 8½ baths, two fireplaces, hardwood floors, a two-story foyer and a garage for at least four cars. The home was built in 2004.

The home is listed with a local real estate agent and featured on the Web site Realtor.com.

A source close to Vick said that, while the banished quarterback has not conceded that he won't resume his career with the Falcons at some point in the future, he has spent very little time lately in the Atlanta area.

Instead, Vick, who has been suspended indefinitely by the NFL, has mostly been with family in his hometown of Newport News, Va., where he is awaiting sentencing in December after pleading guilty to federal dogfighting charges. Vick also faces state charges in Virginia stemming from the dogfighting activities to which he has admitted in federal court.

Within the past five weeks, three banks, most recently Wachovia Bank, have filed suit against Vick and other defendants connected to him, charging that he has defaulted on loans.

Earlier this month, an arbitrator ruled that the Falcons were entitled to pursue repayment of nearly $20 million of the $37 million in bonuses that team had paid Vick as part of the 10-year, $130 million contract extension he signed on Christmas Eve, 2004.

Through the NFL Players Association, Vick has appealed the ruling. It is believed the appeal will not be heard before December.

Len Pasquarelli is a senior writer for ESPN.com.