In Hawaii, Chad Johnson cryptically reiterates ire with Bengals

Updated: February 8, 2008, 10:03 AM ET
By John Clayton | ESPN.com

Chad Johnson arrived late to the Pro Bowl, but he definitely made an impact. Unfortunately for him, it wasn't a good one.

Johnson, who wants to force a trade from the Cincinnati Bengals, did a light NFL Network interview with Jamie Dukes but he blew off the national reporters waiting to talk to him. The scene wasn't pretty. At one point, he brushed aside a NFL public relations representative who tried to stop him because it's mandatory that Pro Bowl players do interviews. Johnson faces a possible fine.

Drew Rosenhaus, Johnson's agent, was in attendance at Thursday's practice. He said he is quietly working behind the scenes to fix the situation. Johnson isn't giving him much help. He was prickly dealing with the media Thursday, which is unusual for one of the most accessible players in the sport.

In the NFL Network interview, Johnson seemingly talked in code. With no follow up questions, it was hard to get his point. Johnson said he wanted those in the Bengals organization who have been speaking out against him to go public with their complaints. He said he was hearing them for 16 weeks.

"But now I don't hear them," Johnson said. "Where are you at now? It's time to let it out. The only voice I hear is mine."

The receiver is at his fifth Pro Bowl, replacing New England's Randy Moss, and he defended his self-promoting manner and discussed his performances.

"Consistently, I've done it," he said in the NFL Network interview, according to The Associated Press. "I haven't done it perfect, but consistently at a high level. I get out of line at times, but what great one doesn't? What great one doesn't get emotional? Find me a great one who hasn't done it like that and I'll be quiet."

The Bengals don't plan to trade Johnson. They also don't plan to get a new contract. He's suggested trades to the Washington Redskins or the Miami Dolphins.

John Clayton is a senior writer for ESPN.com. Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

John Clayton

NFL senior writer