Manning OK after Colts practice

Updated: October 14, 2009, 5:20 PM ET
Associated Press

Peyton Manning

Manning

INDIANAPOLIS -- Peyton Manning's sore left knee is no longer an issue for the Indianapolis Colts.

The three-time league MVP, who said he needed medical treatment on the knee Sunday night, gave himself a clean bill of health after finishing Wednesday's practice.

"No concerns," he said. "It feels fine. It's a non-issue."

Manning said he hurt the knee late in the first half of Sunday's victory at Tennessee, on a play Titans defensive end Kyle Vanden Bosch was called for roughing the passer. Manning finished the game, topped 300 yards for the fifth straight time and showed no indication he had been hurt.

On Monday, coach Jim Caldwell said he had not received a medical report about Manning's knee, an indication that it was only a scare and not something more serious.

Since then, team president Bill Polian, Caldwell and Manning have all said Manning was fine.

The Colts (5-0) may be getting more good news on the injury front after their bye week.

Safety Bob Sanders, the 2007 NFL defensive player of the year, was a limited participant in Wednesday's practice though he did get his most extensive work. Sanders had offseason surgery on his right knee and was held out of practice until last week.

"He is hungry, there's no question about that. I think he's been preparing diligently," Caldwell said. "He looks like Bob, so we're all anxious. When he gets comfortable with what he's doing, we'll get him in there."

Cornerback Kelvin Hayden also practiced after missing the last three games with a left hamstring injury and has said he plans to return to the lineup Oct. 25 at St. Louis.

Wide receiver Anthony Gonzalez, who has not practiced since spraining ligaments in his right knee in the Colts' season-opener, has started running again though it's not clear when Gonzalez may return to the field.

"I'm not real sure. I know he feels good about his progress," Caldwell said. "I know he's out there running."


Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press

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