Steelers to celebrate with Tuesday parade

Updated: February 6, 2006, 10:59 PM ET
Associated Press

PITTSBURGH -- The Steelers will celebrate their Super Bowl victory with a parade through downtown Pittsburgh on Tuesday.

Jerome Bettis
AP/John RaouxThe Steelers' Super Bowl celebration route moved from Detroit to Disney World, but Jerome Bettis won't be bringing Minnie Mouse with him to Pittsburgh Tuesday.

The parade will begin at 11 a.m. at Mellon Arena, the home of the Pittsburgh Penguins. It will end at Point State Park, across the river from Heinz Field.

The Steelers beat the Seattle Seahawks 21-10 on Sunday for their fifth Super Bowl championship since the team was founded in 1933.

Mayor Bob O'Connor's office said that Steelers players, coaches and owners will participate in the parade.

"Tomorrow's parade will be a great opportunity for this region to honor this amazing team and the [Dan] Rooney family for bringing the Vince Lombardi trophy back to the City of Champions," Allegheny county executive Dan Onorato said.

If the pep rallies of the last two weeks are any indication, thousands of Steelers fans are likely to attend. Two large pep rallies, including one at Heinz Field, were held leading up to the Super Bowl in Detroit.

For a while at least, Pittsburgh can forget the tough times. Chief among the city's troubles is that it was declared a distressed municipality two years ago, triggering state oversight of its finances. The region's political and economic leaders hope to capitalize on its recent return to championship status.

The city will have plenty of other moments in the spotlight. In July, PNC Park hosts baseball's All-Star Game. Then, golf's U.S. Open will be played in nearby Oakmont in 2007, and the city celebrates its 250th anniversary in 2008.

Richard Lapchick, a sports sociologist who runs the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida, agreed with local leaders that the city can expect a bounce.

"I think that anytime a victory of this magnitude comes to a city like Pittsburgh, it's got to have a tremendous bounce not only for the people in Pittsburgh, but also people around the country to take a look at Pittsburgh in a different light," Lapchick said. "People who might not have thought about Pittsburgh are going to take a look at Pittsburgh."


Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press

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