Jets' Pro Bowler Jenkins injures calf

Updated: August 2, 2009, 1:25 AM ET
Associated Press

CORTLAND, N.Y. -- Pro Bowl nose tackle Kris Jenkins left the New York Jets' practice Saturday with a strained left calf, an injury not believed to be serious but will likely keep him sidelined a few days.

Jenkins was being blocked midway through practice when he went down, tried to get up and went down again.

"I was in my stance and when I pushed off, I pushed off great and when I stepped to shake, I just felt, 'pop, pop," Jenkins said. "And, when you feel 'pop, pop,' you just stop for a second and then it started tightening up."

He was able to get up and walk gingerly to the trainers' tent on the sideline. Jenkins said he knew it wasn't serious when the training staff didn't call for the cart.

"I don't think I would've been coming out to talk to you all if it was that serious," he said with a smile. "I know my wife is watching and I don't want her to be freaked out, so I'm just letting you know, I'm fine. It happens sometimes."

Jenkins had his left calf wrapped with ice while he rested on his stomach on a table in the tent, and trainers later propped the leg with towels.

"I don't think it's that big a deal," coach Rex Ryan said.

After practice concluded, Jenkins walked very slowly and barely moved his left leg.

"I'm just walking like this because they tell me I can't push off my toes or do any of that so I could let it heal faster," he said. "That's why I look like an old man right now, but it's nothing serious. I bought a couple of days where I have to get up real early so I could do treatment. Other than that, I'll be all right."

When asked if he'd only need treatment for a couple of days, Jenkins said it would be more than that.

"Just in general, I'm saying a couple," he said. "A couple could be four, five or six, I don't know."

Jenkins, acquired last offseason from Carolina, made a huge impact in his first season with the Jets by giving them a run-stopping force in the middle of their defensive line.


Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press