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Former player may seek transfer to Canada prison

11/11/2004 - Mike Danton

EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill. -- Former St. Louis Blues player Mike Danton was sentenced Monday to 7½ years in prison for trying to
have his agent killed.

Danton, 24, said nothing as U.S. District Judge William Stiehl
imposed the sentence.

"I do not believe in over 18 years on the bench I have been
faced with a case as bizarre as this one," Stiehl said, noting
that Danton chose a 19-year-old acquaintance and a police
dispatcher as his would-be helpers in the murder plot.

The judge said the story Danton "concocted was not well thought
out or very believable." He said, "The exact reasons you felt you
needed to engage in a murder plot remain a mystery to me."

Danton is expected to ask to be moved to a prison in his native
Canada. As for his hockey career, there is no parole in the federal
system and, the judge noted, Danton might not be allowed to return
to the United States after completing his sentence.

His contract with the Blues expired after the 2003-04 season.

At the sentencing, Danton's attorney, Robert Haar, apologized on
behalf of Danton "for the pain and disappointment he has caused"
his friends, teammates and fans.

"His aspiration now is to return to Canada and put his life
back together again," Haar said.

Danton pleaded guilty in July to murder conspiracy charges.
Prosecutors said he tried to hire a hit man to kill David Frost,
his agent and Canadian youth hockey coach. A phone call to Frost
was not immediately returned.

Authorities said Danton and Frost had argued over Danton's
alleged promiscuity and alcohol use, and Danton feared Frost would
tell the Blues' front office about his behavior.

In September, a jury acquitted Katie Wolfmeyer, 19, of
Florissant, Mo., of charges she took part in the plot. Wolfmeyer
claimed she did not know Danton was trying to hire a hit man when
she introduced him over the phone to an acquaintance, Justin Levi
Jones. Prosecutors said Danton offered Jones $10,000 to kill Frost.

The plot unraveled when Jones, a police dispatcher, went to
authorities with cell phone recordings of some of his conversations
with Danton.