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Wednesday, May 21

Updated: May 25, 9:49 PM ET

Goalies today measure up to past greats

ESPN.com

ESPN.com asked its hockey analysts to name their top five goaltending performances since the NHL -- and the playoffs -- expanded in 1967-68:

Barry Melrose
1. Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens, 1993:
16-4 (10 OT wins), 2.13 GAA, 3 SO

Patrick won 10 overtime games and had to be his team's best player every night.

2. Bernie Parent, Philadelphia Flyers, 1974:
12-5, 2.02 GAA, 2 SO

The first Stanley Cup is always the hardest for a goalie to win.

3. Billy Smith, New York Islanders, 1980:
15-4, 2.80 GAA, 1 SO

Same goes for Smith, who won the first of four straight in '80.

4. Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens, 1977:
12-2, 1.55 GAA, 4 SO

Dryden's four shutouts in 14 games is a tremendous feat.

5. Grant Fuhr, Edmonton Oilers, 1988: 16-2, 2.90 GAA, 0 SO
His GAA was a little high, but winning 16 of 18 games is what matters.

Darren Pang
T1. Bernie Parent, Philadelphia Flyers, 1974 and 1975:
12-5, 2.0 GAA, 2 SO in '74; 10-5, 1.89, 4 SO in '75

Parent's two outstanding performances made him the only goaltender to win consecutive Conn Smythe trophies. He was in a zone few athletes have ever been in, and he stopped the momentum of every opponent Philly faced.

2. Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens, 1971 (rookie):
12-8, 3.00, 0 SO

Every time the opponent turned around, Dryden was making a great save. I remember vividly seeing Chicago's Jim Pappin take a pass to the right of Dryden, let go with a hard shot and raise his arms to celebrate, only to see Dryden come out of nowhere with a glove save. Those were the kinds of saves that made him great that year.

3. Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens, 1993:
16-4 (10 OT wins), 2.13 GAA, 3 SO

Roy's performance in '93 is what separates future Hall of Famers from mere mortals. He showed unbelievable composure and began to cement his legacy as a leader.

4. Jean-Sebastien Giguere, Anaheim, 2003:
11-2, 1.30 GAA, 4 SO

Giguere's ability to maintain an even-keeled demeanor has been impressive. He has made the difficult saves look easy -- the biggest compliment for a goaltender -- and described a brilliant save on Mike Modano in the conference semifinal by saying, "It looked spectacular because I was out of position."

5. Mike Richter, New York Rangers, 1994:
16-7, 2.07 GAA, 4 SO

Richter combined the saves he was supposed to make with spectacular ones. His teammates were confident in the fact that he was going to make big saves, and his stop on Pavel Bure's penalty shot in Game 4 of the finals is as good as it gets.

Bill Clement
1. Bernie Parent, Philadelphia Flyers, 1974:
12-5, 2.02 GAA, 2 SO

I was a member of this team, and I have a vivid recollection of the amazing saves that Parent constantly made during the playoffs. I wouldn't be wearing my first Stanley Cup ring if not for Parent. The fact that he knocked off a very good New York Rangers team and a Boston Bruins team with a healthy Bobby Orr says enough about Parent's position on this list.

2. Ed Belfour, Dallas Stars, 1999:
16-7, 1.67 GAA, 3 SO

Not only were his numbers terrific, but he defeated Patrick Roy in the conference finals then Dominik Hasek for the Stanley Cup. That alone makes him worthy of the No. 2 position.

3. Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens, 1993:
16-4 (10 OT wins), 2.13 GAA, 3 SO

10 overtime wins. Nothing more needs to be said.

4. Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens, 1977:
12-2, 1.55 GAA, 4 SO

A great record from Dryden places him in the top five.

5. Martin Brodeur, New Jersey Devils, 2000:
16-7, 1.61 GAA, 2 SO

When I remember the overtime game and the saves that Brodeur made against Belfour, I know that the Devils don't win the Stanley Cup without him.

Brian Engblom
1. Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens, 1971 (rookie):
12-8, 3.00, 0 SO

In his first pro season, Dryden started just six regular-season games before winning the Conn Smythe Trophy.

2. Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens, 1986 (rookie):
15-5, 1.92 GAA, 1 SO

A great performance made even better by the fact that Roy was a rookie.

3. Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens, 1977:
12-2, 1.55 GAA, 4 SO

His 1.55 GAA is the lowest for any playoff goalie since the playoffs expanded to eight teams in 1968.

4. Grant Fuhr, Edmonton Oilers, 1988:
16-2, 2.90 GAA, 0 SO

Won 16 of 18 starts while playing a different style of hockey, often facing odd-man rushes in the wide-open '80s.

5. Bernie Parent, Philadelphia Flyers, 1974:
12-5, 2.02 GAA, 2 SO

Backstopped a Flyers team that had no business winning the Cup.

Ray Ferraro
1. Ken Dryden, Montreal Canadiens, 1971:
12-8, 3.00, 0 SO

Dryden won the Conn Smythe before he won the Calder Trophy, and made saves against Chicago in Game 7 of the finals that are some of the earliest big saves I remember.

2. Bernie Parent, Philadelphia Flyers, 1974:
12-5, 2.02 GAA, 2 SO

The Bruins were a machine in '73-74, but Parent kept the Flyers in games when they weren't sure they could compete.

3. Patrick Roy, Montreal Canadiens, 1993:
16-4 (10 OT wins), 2.13 GAA, 3 SO

What more do you need to say than 10 overtime victories?

4. Jean-Sebastien Giguere, Anaheim, 2003:
11-2, 1.30 GAA, 4 SO

His save percentage is .956 heading into the Stanley Cup finals, and he has beaten the top two seeds in the West (No. 1 Detroit and No. 2 Dallas).

5. Mike Richter, New York Rangers, 1994:
16-7, 2.07 GAA, 4 SO

Playing with 54 years of pressure on his back, his team came back from 3-2 down against New Jersey in the East finals.

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