Armstrong to run in another NYC Marathon


JACKSON, Miss. -- Lance Armstrong has another date with the New York City Marathon.

The seven-time Tour de France winner ran the marathon in November for the first time and finished 856th, barely beating his goal of breaking three hours.

"I'm gonna do it again," Armstrong told The Associated Press on Monday during a break from a meeting of the President's Cancer Panel.

After finishing the 26.2-mile race in November, Armstrong called it "without a doubt the hardest physical thing I have ever done."

"It was really a gradual progression of fatigue and soreness," he said at the time. "In 20 years of pro sports and endurance sports, even the worst days on the Tour, nothing felt like that or left me the way I feel now."

Though marathons are held around the country, Armstrong said New York is the one to do.

"Hawaii would be too hot. I couldn't run a marathon there," he said, adding that the scope of the New York race will help fundraising possibilities for his charity, The Lance Armstrong Foundation.

In 1996, Armstrong was diagnosed with testicular cancer that spread to his abdomen, lungs and brain. He returned to cycling nine months after his diagnosis.

Armstrong has been a member since 2002 of the President's Cancer Panel, which visits four cities a year to hold daylong meetings to gather information about cancer treatment and prevention.

Armstrong joined members of the panel on Monday in Jackson to discuss research and public policy about tobacco.

"Smoking is something that is clearly deadly, not just for the people that choose to do it but for the people around them as well," Armstrong said.