<
>

Catfish Gumbo

5/13/2009

Fishing for chainsawas! — 5/13/2009
On Oklahoma's Grand River just east of Tulsa is a place the locals call Choteau Bend. If you launch a boat at the ramp here and motor upstream, you'll soon encounter an old lowhead dam that impedes any further progress. Water boils as it spills over the structure, creating a dangerous-looking maelstrom of whirlpools and waves. Were you to accidentally fall in, there's a distinct possibility you would die. Continue reading...

Five Southern hotspots to fish before you die — 4/20/2009
Catfish, crappie, trout, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass — if these fish are among those you love to catch, listen up. Before you kick the bucket and go to that great fishing hole in the sky, you'll want to plan a trip to these extraordinary Southern hotspots where you can get a real taste of heaven on earth. On these waters, the catching is as good as the fishing. Continue reading...

Recipes for white bass — 3/25/2009
Here in Arkansas, it's that time of year again when the white bass are beginning their spawning runs. Thousands upon thousands of these "sand bass," as they're often called, are moving into the tributaries of major rivers and reservoirs, and during the next several weeks, anglers will catch millions of these plentiful members of the temperate bass family. For some white bass aficionados, there is no season but spring. When the spawning runs end, so does the fishing. Continue reading...

Signs of spring — 3/22/2009
Spring has definitely sprung here in the South. The signs are everywhere.

The first clue I had that winter definitely is over and spring is here to stay was an abundance of turtles on the road. While driving from my home in Little Rock to Reelfoot Lake week before last, I hit one stretch of road in northwest Tennessee flanked on both sides by big tracts of flooded bottomland. In a stretch that covered just a mile, I counted more than a dozen red-eared turtles crossing from one side of the highway to the other. I see this each year around this time, as the turtles come out of their muddy-bottom winter hideouts and make their way to nesting sites. And there's rarely another serious cold spell after I see the turtles making their trek. Continue reading...

The beef on buffalos — 3/20/2009
While I was over at Reelfoot Lake in Tennessee last week, I stopped by a spot between Tiptonville and Samburg called "The Spillway." There I met several guys who were bank fishing for one of the fish I love most to eat: the buffalo. These guys weren't just fishing either; they were catching. They had a washtub in the back of their truck full of buffalo fish ranging in size from about 5 pounds up to 35. Looked like they were having a great time, and I sure wished I'd had more time myself so I could have stayed and fished with them. Continue reading...

Quake Lake crappie — 3/20/2009
On December 16, 1811, residents of the Mississippi River Valley were awakened by horrifying noise. The earth shook violently, cabin timbers groaned and cracked, chimneys toppled, and furniture was thrown about. Terrified people hurriedly abandoned their homes to escape falling debris and remained shivering in the winter air till morning. Continue reading...

Politics on the prairie — 3/10/2009
I hope you'll pardon me today if I get up on my soapbox and rail a bit about some of the narrow-minded politicians who are allowed to make important decisions that affect all of us. Continue reading...

A dozen Ozark smallmouth floats — 2/19/2009
Snow flurries were falling from a silvery February sky. It seemed crazy to be starting a float-fishing trip, but that we were. We pushed our canoe from the gravel bar and began day one of a two-day float down north Arkansas' Buffalo National River. We quickly became absorbed in the scenic Ozark Mountains landscape that surrounds the river near Rush. Continue reading...


Fishing tackle brands anglers prefer most
— 2/16/2009
In yesterday's blog, I showed you the hunting and shooting products preferred most in 2008. Today, we're focusing on last year's most favored fishing products. This information comes from surveys of 22,486 anglers conducted by Southwick Associates at AnglerSurvey.com. Continue reading...

Favored hunting and shooting brands — 2/15/2009
Last week a company called Southwick Associates announced the brands and products hunters and shooters preferred most in 2008. SA compiled the list using information gathered from 24,206 hunters and target shooters in surveys conducted at HunterSurvey.com and TargetshooterSurvey.com last year. Continue reading...

Hunting Beaver Dam at last — 2/09/2009
Duck season has ended. I wish it hadn't. For the first time in several years, I spent lots of time in a blind — several blinds, actually. And the hunts I enjoyed this season will be long remembered. Continue reading...


What happened to our quail? Part II
— 1/22/2009
Not all is bad news on the bobwhite quail front. In 2007, conditions in some states were such that bobwhites populations rebounded, at least temporarily, providing better hunting than has been seen in recent years. Continue reading...


What happened to our quail? Part I
— 1/15/2009
I've never been a hardcore quail hunter — the go-at-it-every-day-of-the-season kind of guy who babies his bird dog like his only child and guards his favorite coverts with the ferocity of a sow grizzly. Nevertheless, I've been a bobwhite fan since I was old enough to carry a shotgun. Continue reading...

Morning in a duck blind — 1/11/2009
5:30 a.m.: After a short boat ride, George, Bob and I arrive at our blind in the Middle Hole, a small clearing in the flooded hardwoods. It's still dark outside, so we use flashlights to illuminate our way inside the big elevated blind from which we'll hunt. Everyone checks their shotguns to be sure they're unloaded before handing them in, then each of us arranges his gear so it'll be within reach when shooting time comes. Continue reading...

Possum days gone by — 1/03/2009
Does anyone know if you can buy a good possum dog nowadays?

When I was a kid I had a dandy, an old black-and-white setter named Rusty. He belonged to my uncle, actually, but when Rusty failed to show an interest in pointing quail, and began exhibiting a knack for tracking and treeing possums, my uncle loaned him to me permanently. Continue reading...