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Off the wire

4/17/2010

Obama Admin looks to cast a line with anglers

The Obama administration is launching a significant new effort to reach out to marine recreational fishermen, an economically and politically powerful group that has previously felt shut out by the new administration. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the main federal agency overseeing ocean and fisheries policy, has rolled out a series of new initiatives in the past month aimed at raising the profile of recreational fishing within the agency and calming some of the hostile waters between fishermen and the administration.

Read the complete story from the New York Times.


Panel sets fishing seasons for West Coast salmon

PORTLAND, Ore. — For the first time since 2007, commercial and recreational fishermen will be able to cast their lines for ocean salmon from the Canadian border to Mexico. The Pacific Fishery Management Council approved seasons and quotas for chinook and coho salmon off the coasts of Washington, Oregon and California on Thursday, as it completed a weeklong session establishing policy and seasons for ocean fisheries. The coast off California and much of Oregon has been closed to commercial fishing the last two seasons because of declining salmon runs.

Read the complete story from the Associated Press.


Top US fisheries cop replaced after paper shred
BOSTON — The nation's top fisheries cop was replaced after a federal review detailed mismanagement at his agency and found that he ordered dozens of files destroyed during the investigation. Dale Jones was removed as director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's law enforcement office and was replaced on an interim basis by Alan Risenhoover, head of NOAA's Sustainable Fisheries Office.

Read the complete story from the Associated Press.


Study: Closing locks for carp would cost billions
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — Closing shipping locks in Chicago waterways to prevent Asian carp from invading the Great Lakes would cost the area economy about $4.7 billion over two decades, according to an analysis released Wednesday. That report from the Illinois Chamber of Commerce envisions a far greater economic ripple than a February study commissioned by the state of Michigan, which is leading a legal campaign to close the locks temporarily while a long-term solution to the Asian carp threat is devised.

Read the complete story from the Associated Press.


Chile's struggling fishermen offer tsunami tours
SANTIAGO, Chile — Weeks after a tsunami destroyed their livelihoods, some of Chile's struggling independent fishermen are offering boat tours of the devastation. Aergio Rodriguez, a boat captain in the port city of Talcahuano, 300 miles south of the capital, Santiago, found tourists were eager to pay $3 for half-hour boat trips around the battered bay.

Read the complete story from the Associated Press.


World's deepest known undersea volcanic vent found
LONDON — Scientists using a remote-controlled submarine have discovered the deepest known volcanic vent and say the superheated waters inside could contain undiscovered marine species and perhaps even clues to the origin of life on earth.

Read the complete story from the Associated Press.


Canada's annual seal hunt kicks off
TORONTO — Canada's annual seal hunt got under way Thursday despite a dwindling market for pelts and other byproducts following a European Union import ban and slumping demand.

Read the complete story from the Associated Press.


Alaska eagle survives plunge after mating dance
ANCHORAGE, Alaska — An acrobatic display of passion proved too much for a pair of eagles engaged in a mating dance over Alaska's Prince William Sound. The female bird is recovering from an injured wing and other injuries sustained when the couple slammed beak-first into a hard snowbank in what her rescuers believe was an aerial courting ritual gone awry. The male eagle died in the impact.

Read the complete story from the Associated Press.